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Math Help - How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

  1. #1
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    How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

    I need help calculating a percentage that is more than 100%. Here is the main portion of the problem: "The arenas alone have ended up costing nearly 300 percent more than was planned - nearly $4 billion total and growing." I can't figure out how to determine what 4,000,000,000 is 300% of. Please help.

    Thank you,
    ondverg
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  2. #2
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    Re: How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

    Quote Originally Posted by ondverg View Post
    I need help calculating a percentage that is more than 100%. Here is the main portion of the problem: "The arenas alone have ended up costing nearly 300 percent more than was planned - nearly $4 billion total and growing." I can't figure out how to determine what 4,000,000,000 is 300% of. Please help.

    Thank you,
    ondverg
    per cent means per 100 so

    P% of X is (P/100)X

    so 300% of X is (300/100)X = 3X

    we have here that 300% X = 4000000000 so

    3X = 4000000000

    X = 4/3 x 1000000000 ~ 1.33 x 109
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  3. #3
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    Re: How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

    Thank you for helping me, romsek. I want to make sure I asked the question right. So, if the arenas cost more than was originally planned, then the original cost should have been 1 billion dollars and the 300% increase makes it 4 billion dollars? The 1.33 x 10^9 is confusing me. Does this mean that the original cost should be 1,333,333,333.00 and not 1,000,000,000.00?

    ondverg
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    Re: How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

    yes. 1 and 1/3 billion dollars instead of 1 billion, i.e. $1,333,333,333.00

    (1 1/3)x3 = 3 3/3 = 4
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    Re: How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

    Okay, I got this time! Thanks again, romsek. :-)
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    Re: How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

    In general "A percent of B" mean \frac{A}{100}\times B. Given that "4 billion dollars is 300% move than was planned" and letting "B" represent "what was planned" that can be written \frac{300}{100}\times B= 4,000,000,000 which is the same as 3B= 4,000,000,000 and we can find B by dividing both sides by 3
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  7. #7
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    Re: How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

    Thanks, HallsofIvy.
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    Re: How do I calculate a percentage that is above 100%?

    Hello
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