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Math Help - demolition ball, whats the tension in the cable

  1. #1
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    demolition ball, whats the tension in the cable

    A 1900 kg demolition ball swings at the end of a 15 m cable on the arc of a vertical circle. At the lowest point of the swing, the ball is moving at a speed of 7.4 m/s. Determine the tension in the cable.

    also i know that the tension force has the same purpose as the normal force.

    please help me with this one.
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  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcmango View Post
    A 1900 kg demolition ball swings at the end of a 15 m cable on the arc of a vertical circle. At the lowest point of the swing, the ball is moving at a speed of 7.4 m/s. Determine the tension in the cable.

    also i know that the tension force has the same purpose as the normal force.

    please help me with this one.
    The tension is equal to the sum of the weight ( mg) and the force needed to
    deflect linear motion into circular motion about the suspension point ( mv \dot{\theta}).

    RonL
    Last edited by CaptainBlack; November 1st 2007 at 04:34 AM. Reason: changed r to v
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by rcmango View Post
    A 1900 kg demolition ball swings at the end of a 15 m cable on the arc of a vertical circle. At the lowest point of the swing, the ball is moving at a speed of 7.4 m/s. Determine the tension in the cable.

    also i know that the tension force has the same purpose as the normal force.

    please help me with this one.
    As usual, the first point of attack on this problem is to sketch a Free-Body Diagram. All of your forces are in the vertical direction, so you only have one direction to consider. Also, as I (I think) have mentioned to you before, the centripetal force is the same as the net force in the radial direction.

    So calling the vertical direction the y axis:
    \sum F_y = F_c

    and go from there.

    -Dan
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