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Math Help - physics particles problem

  1. #1
    Senior Member
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    physics particles problem

    three particles far away from any other objects and located on a straight line.
    The masses of these particles are:
    mA = 363 kg,
    mB = 517 kg, and
    mC = 154 kg.

    Find the magnitude and direction of the net gravitational force acting on each of the three particles (let the direction to the right be positive).


    what is particle A in Newtons
    what is particle B in Newtons
    what is particle C in Newtons

    what is going on with this problem? Please help.

    heres a pic of whats going on: http://img81.imageshack.us/img81/3663/p498in0.gif
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  2. #2
    Junior Member Spimon's Avatar
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    The force of attraction between 2 particles in space is given by Newton's Theory of Gravitation (see first image).

    Each particle has the right to view itself as stationary and the other particles moving towards it, so the arrows in the final diagram don't necessarily represent the direction of movement. This just shows the force between the 2 particles (may not be relevant depending on what level of study you are at). And of course as the direction to the right is defined as positive, to the left is negative (which I forgot to add in the diagrams).


    Last edited by Spimon; October 26th 2007 at 01:50 AM.
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  3. #3
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    okay, i see how particle A has the answer of 5.67 x 10^-5,

    however, it seems that your finding the magnitude of A to C and then adding A to B with it. If its the magnitude of A to C we want, why add an extra A to B with it.

    I'm just confused of whats going on really. but i see how the answers were calculated.

    thanks alot.
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