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Math Help - Newtons second law, help needed.

  1. #1
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    Question Newtons second law, help needed.

    A 0,51kg heavy stone is in free fall, how heavy is the stone?
    Thanks in advance
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  2. #2
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    Re: Newtons second law, help needed.

    Found out, i was looking at the wrong formula
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  3. #3
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    Re: Newtons second law, help needed.

    Would you mind sharing the answer? And what does "how heavy" exactly mean in the question?
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    Re: Newtons second law, help needed.

    F=m*a second law
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    Re: Newtons second law, help needed.

    Quote Originally Posted by Oldspice1212 View Post
    F=m*a second law
    Actually Newton's 2nd is
    \Sigma F = ma (That's a capital sigma and means "sum of")

    Which means you need to factor in the force of gravity as well. How would you do that?

    -Dan
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  6. #6
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    Re: Newtons second law, help needed.

    You still haven't answered the basic question, "what do you mean by "heavy", here?"

    One way of defining "heavy" is the object's weight: "the force of gravity on an object" which is always "mg", the mass times the acceleration due to gravity. Since you give the mass in kg, use g= 9.81 m/s^2.

    But more common is the force with which an object is pressing down on a floor, scale, your hand, etc. Here, since the object is not pressing down on anything there is no force- its "heaviness" is 0.
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