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Math Help - Acceleration confussion

  1. #1
    Senior Member vaironxxrd's Avatar
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    Acceleration confussion

    I have solved an example problem given in my book, but I don't understand why are the second being squared.

    \frac{0 m/s - 30m/s}{3.0s} = -10m/s^2

    Is it looking like this at some point \frac{-30 m^2/s^2}{3.0s}

    And if so why are the seconds not canceling?
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  2. #2
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    Re: Acceleration confussion

    remember how to divide fractions?

    \frac{\frac{m}{s}}{s} = \frac{\frac{m}{s}}{\frac{s}{1}} = \frac{m}{s} \cdot \frac{1}{s} = \frac{m}{s^2}

    you need to understand that acceleration is the change in velocity per unit time ... (meters per second) per second = \frac{m}{s^2}
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    Senior Member vaironxxrd's Avatar
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    Re: Acceleration confussion

    Quote Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
    remember how to divide fractions?

    \frac{\frac{m}{s}}{s} = \frac{\frac{m}{s}}{\frac{s}{1}} = \frac{m}{s} \cdot \frac{1}{s} = \frac{m}{s^2}

    you need to understand that acceleration is the change in velocity per unit time ... (meters per second) per second = \frac{m}{s^2}
    So if I was given the acceleration of let's say a car,

    Acceleration = 5m/s^2

    And I would like to know how long would it take a car traveling at 20m/s To reach 30m/s

    Would I just say \frac{10m/s}{5m/s^2}

    = 2s?
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  4. #4
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    Re: Acceleration confussion

    yes, since ...

    a = \frac{\Delta v}{\Delta t}

    then ...

    \Delta t = \frac{\Delta v}{a}
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