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Math Help - Atomic model

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    Atomic model

    Please read my doubt in the attachment and answer it.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksssudhanva View Post
    Please read my doubt in the attachment and answer it.
    I'm not sure exactly how to answer your question because I'm not sure how much you know.

    I will start with this and you can guide me from there about anything you are unsure of or if it doesn't actually answer your question:

    The orbitals are spatial representations of a probability distribution for an electron with those particular quantum numbers. But the electron can be found virtually anywhere in space. For example, the electron in the 1s orbital has n = 1, l = 0 quantum numbers. This electron ends up spending most of its time in a spherical shell around the nucleus. But there is a calculable chance that the electron will be closer to the nucleus, farther from the nucleus (or in Cape Cod for that matter!) It is not by any means confined to that spherical shell.

    -Dan
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    I know that the electron will move ni the spherical space of 1s orbital.But wont it loose energy by going near the nucleus and away from th nucleus?
    Please answer the remaining questions also.
    thank you.
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksssudhanva View Post
    I know that the electron will move ni the spherical space of 1s orbital.But wont it loose energy by going near the nucleus and away from th nucleus?

    No its the time energy uncertainty principle that allows it to be somewhere
    you think it can't be:

    \frac{\Delta E}{ \Delta t} \ge \frac{\hbar}{2}

    RonL
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    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ksssudhanva View Post
    I know that the electron will move ni the spherical space of 1s orbital.But wont it loose energy by going near the nucleus and away from th nucleus?
    Please answer the remaining questions also.
    thank you.
    The electron's energy in the 1s orbital is quantized. That is to say that it has a constant value. (Well, there's the uncertainty principle as mentioned by CaptainBlack, so the energy does vary a little, but this has nothing to do with its actual position in reference to the nucleus.) Even if this were a planetary system you would not be quite correct: the energy of a planet in its orbit is constant no matter where it is in the orbit. However in the planetary model the planet stays in a specific orbit, which is basically just a path. In the atomic model the electron may be anywhere in space, the average position at any time being given by the probability density for its quantum numbers.

    -Dan
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