Results 1 to 6 of 6

Math Help - Help with fractions

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    May 2011
    Posts
    3

    Help with fractions

    Can someone please tell me how to explain to a 3rd grader how to find fractions greater than 3/4??
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor

    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    18,801
    Thanks
    1691
    Awards
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Kimber View Post
    Can someone please tell me how to explain to a 3rd grader how to find fractions greater than 3/4??
    Does that third grader know that \frac{3}{4}=\frac{6}{8}~?
    If so then \frac{7}{8} works.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Super Member TheChaz's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    From
    Northwest Arkansas
    Posts
    600
    Thanks
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    Does that third grader know that \frac{3}{4}=\frac{6}{8}~?
    If so then \frac{7}{8} works.
    To add to Plato's reply, we can take \frac{4}{5}, which is less than \frac{5}{6}, which is less than...

    ... \frac{100}{101}, which is less than... etc.

    Any fraction of the form \frac{n}{n+1}, where n is a whole number, will get closer and closer to "1.000" as n gets larger.
    But you might want to leave that part out of the discussion with the 3rd grader...
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Newbie
    Joined
    May 2011
    Posts
    3
    She really understood it thatnks. For lesser than would it work the same way but substact one?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Super Member TheChaz's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    From
    Northwest Arkansas
    Posts
    600
    Thanks
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Kimber View Post
    She really understood it thanks. For lesser than would it work the same way but subtract one?
    Yes, but you'll run out (at least if you stick to the pattern n/(n +1)) after 1/2. Or maybe 0/1!

    What you can do is to increase the denominator (bottom) while leaving the numerator (top) the same.
    This would make a bunch of sense to a 3rd grader if you expressed the number of pizza each person got at a party with a fraction...

    1/7 means 1 pizza for 7 people.
    2/5 means 2 pizzas for 5 people. If we only have 2 pizzas but keep inviting more and more people, we get...
    2/20 --> 2 pizzas for 20 people.
    2/100 --> 2 pizzas for 100 people...
    etc.
    Clearly you can tell that each person will only get a bite after increasing the denominator sufficiently!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    Newbie
    Joined
    May 2011
    Posts
    3
    Thats awesome thank you very much she says that makes more sense!!! =^)
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 0
    Last Post: April 28th 2010, 09:53 AM
  2. Simplifying Fractions over fractions
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: January 28th 2009, 10:20 AM
  3. Fractions
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 12th 2009, 12:37 PM
  4. Algebraic fractions with 3 or more fractions
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: November 19th 2008, 02:52 AM
  5. simplifing fractions over fractions
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: December 16th 2007, 01:57 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum