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Math Help - Buy Two and Get one Free?

  1. #1
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    Buy Two and Get one Free?

    I go to the supermarket and they have an offer on, which says; Buy Two and get one free.

    I am then asked to calculate the price per litre of the drink. Each carton contains 1 litre.

    The 1 litre cartons are 1.20 each, so I say well surely 1.20 x 2 = 2.40 and I get one free?

    My misunderstanding follows;

    Why should the third carton which is free be included in the calculation?

    If 1 litre = 1.20 / 3 litres = 0.40 p

    0.40 x 3 = 1.20, surely this can't be right as then two cartons would be free?

    If it is right, what is the 0.40 p referring to, is it the cost to the retailer??

    Thanks in advance

    David
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  2. #2
    Master Of Puppets
    pickslides's Avatar
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    I see it like this.

    One litre costs 1.20.

    Now for two litres (well really 3 because this is where the freebie is thrown in) is now three litres for the proce of two. The consumer has three litres and paid 2.40 the price of two.

    So the answer is 2.40/3 = 0.80.
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