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Math Help - Figure 1 shows Earth, the Sun, and five different possible positions for the Moon...?

  1. #1
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    Question Figure 1 shows Earth, the Sun, and five different possible positions for the Moon...?

    Figure 1 shows Earth, the Sun, and five different possible positions for the Moon during one full orbit. It is important to recall that one half of the Moon’s surface is illuminated by sunlight at all times. For each of the five positions of the Moon shown below, the Moon has been shaded on one side to indicate the half of the Moon’s surface that is NOT being illuminated by sunlight. Note that this drawing is not to scale.



    Match the moon position (A-G) with the picture that correctly shows the phase of the moon in that position.


    At position A, you would see?





    HOW do i do this???
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  2. #2
    Senior Member BAdhi's Avatar
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    At position C, moon is half lightened, while at B it's full moon so at the path between B and C most of the area visible to earth should be white. So it has to be either C or E.
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    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by benjixbunn View Post
    Figure 1 shows Earth, the Sun, and five different possible positions for the Moon during one full orbit. It is important to recall that one half of the Moon’s surface is illuminated by sunlight at all times. For each of the five positions of the Moon shown below, the Moon has been shaded on one side to indicate the half of the Moon’s surface that is NOT being illuminated by sunlight. Note that this drawing is not to scale.



    Match the moon position (A-G) with the picture that correctly shows the phase of the moon in that position.


    At position A, you would see?





    HOW do i do this???
    Hmmm... does this not depend which hemisphere the moon is viewed from?

    CB
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  4. #4
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    When the Moon is at position A, the situation is approximately the following.



    As you can see, the observer sees a little shadow on the left of the Moon (between C and D), while the right edge is fully illuminated.
    Last edited by emakarov; February 15th 2011 at 09:09 AM. Reason: Fixed the names of points.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainBlack View Post
    Hmmm... does this not depend which hemisphere the moon is viewed from?

    CB
    Yes, indeed it does. To get the correct answer in the southern hemisphere, stand on your head to view the moon, otherwise turn the figure upside down.

    It will also look much different when viewed from near the equator!
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  6. #6
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by SammyS View Post
    Yes, indeed it does. To get the correct answer in the southern hemisphere, stand on your head to view the moon, otherwise turn the figure upside down.

    It will also look much different when viewed from near the equator!
    At the equator view lying down with feet to the East

    CB
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