Results 1 to 15 of 15

Math Help - What good mathematical book to buy

  1. #1
    Senior Member vaironxxrd's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    From
    USA
    Posts
    428
    Thanks
    1
    Awards
    1

    What good mathematical book to buy

    Hello guys i am trying to perfect my math and i feel i am on the right road i don't know if this is a waist of money, but i think a mathematical book should help me if i buy a good one.

    Im looking for Geometry levers and above ( if it contains a little bit of everything it would be better)
    More than 400 pages or close.
    Able to be bought in Barnes and noble.
    and Other characteristics you Guys Known...
    Feel free to add more info. Thanks!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    A Plied Mathematician
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    From
    CT, USA
    Posts
    6,318
    Thanks
    5
    Awards
    2
    Highly recommend Mathematics for the Nonmathematician, by Morris Kline.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Senior Member vaironxxrd's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    From
    USA
    Posts
    428
    Thanks
    1
    Awards
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet View Post
    Highly recommend Mathematics for the Nonmathematician, by Morris Kline.
    3 dollars sounds nice thanks but to make the Barnes and noble free shipping need 25$ and idk what else to buy i would love more math stuff
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Senior Member vaironxxrd's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    From
    USA
    Posts
    428
    Thanks
    1
    Awards
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet View Post
    Highly recommend Mathematics for the Nonmathematician, by Morris Kline.
    By the way how many pages does it have? For it price it looks like , less than 200 pages
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    A Plied Mathematician
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    From
    CT, USA
    Posts
    6,318
    Thanks
    5
    Awards
    2
    You know, it's only a bargain if you're looking for it, right?

    Mathematics for the Nonmathematician has, according to Amazon, 641 pages. It's a Dover Publications book. Dover specializes in old classics that they print at low cost. I love Dover!

    You could get the same author's Calculus: An Intuitive and Physical Approach. And if even that isn't enough, have a little fun and get N. David Mermin's Boojums All the Way Through, a wonderful book about writing science well.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    A Plied Mathematician
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    From
    CT, USA
    Posts
    6,318
    Thanks
    5
    Awards
    2
    Incidentally, I should warn you that in Mathematics for the Nonmathematician, Kline mounts a wrong-headed attack on Augustine in Chapter 1, page 1, which takes the form of this quotation:

    One can wisely doubt whether the study of mathematics is worth while and can find good authority to support him. As far back as about the year 400 A.D., St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo in Africa and one of the great fathers of Christianity, had this to say:

    The good Christian should beware of mathematicians and all those who make empty prophecies. The danger already exists that the mathematicians have made a covenant with the devil to darken the spirit and to confine man in the bonds of Hell.
    Perhaps St. Augustine, with prophetic insight into the conflicts which were to arise later between the mathematically minded scientists of recent centuries and religious leaders, was seeking to discourage the further development of the subject. At any rate there is no question as to his attitude.
    Unfortunately, there is almost nothing correct here. The latin word mathematici cannot, given the context in which the word appears, be translated "mathematician". Instead, it must be translated "numerologist". The correct translation of the Augustine passage reads thus:

    For this reason, the good Christian should beware not only numerologists, but all those who make impious divinations, above all when they tell truth. Otherwise, they may deceive the soul, and ensnare her in a pact of friendship with demons.
    See here for a reference. So you see that Augustine cannot be made out to object to mathematics.

    In addition, the way Kline refers to the conflict between the mathematically minded scientists and the religious leaders makes it seem like the conflict was between science and religion, whereas it was not. This is neither the time nor the place for this debate, so I won't go into it. I just wanted to warn you about some of the inaccuracies. It's still a really good book on mathematics.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  7. #7
    Senior Member vaironxxrd's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    From
    USA
    Posts
    428
    Thanks
    1
    Awards
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet View Post
    Incidentally, I should warn you that in Mathematics for the Nonmathematician, Kline mounts a wrong-headed attack on Augustine in Chapter 1, page 1, which takes the form of this quotation:



    Unfortunately, there is almost nothing correct here. The latin word mathematici cannot, given the context in which the word appears, be translated "mathematician". Instead, it must be translated "numerologist". The correct translation of the Augustine passage reads thus:



    See here for a reference. So you see that Augustine cannot be made out to object to mathematics.

    In addition, the way Kline refers to the conflict between the mathematically minded scientists and the religious leaders makes it seem like the conflict was between science and religion, whereas it was not. This is neither the time nor the place for this debate, so I won't go into it. I just wanted to warn you about some of the inaccuracies. It's still a really good book on mathematics.
    Well looks like i still don't understand anything haha, Ill read it tomorrow.
    This definitely deserver both a thanks and a Forum thanks.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  8. #8
    Grand Panjandrum
    Joined
    Nov 2005
    From
    someplace
    Posts
    14,972
    Thanks
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by vaironxxrd View Post
    Hello guys i am trying to perfect my math and i feel i am on the right road i don't know if this is a waist of money, but i think a mathematical book should help me if i buy a good one.

    Im looking for Geometry levers and above ( if it contains a little bit of everything it would be better)
    More than 400 pages or close.
    Able to be bought in Barnes and noble.
    and Other characteristics you Guys Known...
    Feel free to add more info. Thanks!
    What is Mathematics by Courant and Robbins
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  9. #9
    Grand Panjandrum
    Joined
    Nov 2005
    From
    someplace
    Posts
    14,972
    Thanks
    4
    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet
    Incidentally, I should warn you that in Mathematics for the Nonmathematician, Kline mounts a wrong-headed attack on Augustine in Chapter 1, page 1, which takes the form of this quotation:

    One can wisely doubt whether the study of mathematics is worth while and can find good authority to support him. As far back as about the year 400 A.D., St. Augustine, Bishop of Hippo in Africa and one of the great fathers of Christianity, had this to say:

    The good Christian should beware of mathematicians and all those who make empty prophecies. The danger already exists that the mathematicians have made a covenant with the devil to darken the spirit and to confine man in the bonds of Hell.
    Perhaps St. Augustine, with prophetic insight into the conflicts which were to arise later between the mathematically minded scientists of recent centuries and religious leaders, was seeking to discourage the further development of the subject. At any rate there is no question as to his attitude.
    Unfortunately, there is almost nothing correct here. The latin word mathematici cannot, given the context in which the word appears, be translated "mathematician". Instead, it must be translated "numerologist". The correct translation of the Augustine passage reads thus:

    For this reason, the good Christian should beware not only numerologists, but all those who make impious divinations, above all when they tell truth. Otherwise, they may deceive the soul, and ensnare her in a pact of friendship with demons.
    See here for a reference. So you see that Augustine cannot be made out to object to mathematics.

    In addition, the way Kline refers to the conflict between the mathematically minded scientists and the religious leaders makes it seem like the conflict was between science and religion, whereas it was not. This is neither the time nor the place for this debate, so I won't go into it. I just wanted to warn you about some of the inaccuracies. It's still a really good book on mathematics.
    You know that you are ruining one of my favourite stories/jokes by providing the real back story.

    But we don't have to travel far in time or space from Augustine and Hippo to find a mathematician/philosophers being torn appart by christian monks/fanatics at the instigation of another church father, "saint" and patriarch. So just maybe the joke interpretation is closer to his real meaning (and/or that of his co-religionists) than some might like us to believe.

    CB
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  10. #10
    A Plied Mathematician
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    From
    CT, USA
    Posts
    6,318
    Thanks
    5
    Awards
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by CaptainBlack View Post
    You know that you are ruining one of my favourite stories/jokes by providing the real back story.

    But we don't have to travel far in time or space from Augustine and Hippo to find a mathematician/philosophers being torn appart by christian monks/fanatics at the instigation of another church father, "saint" and patriarch. So just maybe the joke interpretation is closer to his real meaning (and/or that of his co-religionists) than some might like us to believe.

    CB
    Hehe. You know, the whole time I was writing post # 6, I was thinking to myself, "What's CB going to do/say?"
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  11. #11
    Super Member
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    715
    Thanks
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet View Post
    Quote Originally Posted by Kline View Post
    "The good Christian should beware of mathematicians and all those who make empty prophecies. The danger already exists that the mathematicians have made a covenant with the devil to darken the spirit and to confine man in the bonds of Hell." -- Augustine of Hippo.
    If time travel was possible, I would have argued that Bishop Berkeley has read Kline and took the quote-mined advice all too seriously!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  12. #12
    A Plied Mathematician
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    From
    CT, USA
    Posts
    6,318
    Thanks
    5
    Awards
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by TheCoffeeMachine View Post
    If time travel was possible, I would have argued that Bishop Berkeley has read Kline and took the quote-mined advice all too seriously!
    In the words of Don Pedro from Much Ado about Nothing, "[T]his learned constable is too cunning to be understood."

    Took which advice seriously? And how interpreted?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  13. #13
    Senior Member vaironxxrd's Avatar
    Joined
    Nov 2010
    From
    USA
    Posts
    428
    Thanks
    1
    Awards
    1
    Are these math jokes?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  14. #14
    Super Member
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    Posts
    715
    Thanks
    2
    Quote Originally Posted by Ackbeet View Post
    In the words of Don Pedro from Much Ado about Nothing, "[T]his learned constable is too cunning to be understood."

    Took which advice seriously? And how interpreted?
    I'm talking about The Analyst: A DISCOURSE Addressed to an Infidel Mathematician. The writer, Bishop Berkeley, appears to have taken Augustine's warning of good Christians against 'mathematicians', as found in Kline's book... Never mind! (I must say I saw the quote as someone's signature in another forum and was bit perplexed by it. It makes more sense now).
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  15. #15
    A Plied Mathematician
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    From
    CT, USA
    Posts
    6,318
    Thanks
    5
    Awards
    2
    Hmm. If the wiki page to which you linked is to be believed, then here's a highly relevant quote, I think:

    The general point was not to mock mathematics or mathematicians (Berkeley himself was an accomplished mathematician in his youth), but rather to show that mathematicians, like Christians, relied upon incomprehensible 'mysteries' in the foundations of their reasoning.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Looking for a good book for Analysis
    Posted in the Differential Geometry Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: August 28th 2011, 10:54 AM
  2. Good Mathematics book! :)
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: May 9th 2010, 06:09 PM
  3. Good Geometry Book?
    Posted in the Geometry Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: March 9th 2010, 05:51 AM
  4. A good calculus III book?
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: March 19th 2009, 12:30 AM
  5. I need a good book
    Posted in the Advanced Statistics Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 27th 2007, 08:43 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum