Results 1 to 9 of 9

Math Help - Best Books to teach yourself math?

  1. #1
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    3

    Best Books to teach yourself math?

    I am a university student currently studying for a B.A, thus little math is required. I've never been historically great at math, I know basic arithmitic and have intermediate algebra down, but I'd really like to give myself a better understanding and perhaps reach higher levels of math by studying on my own. Therefore, I'd like to ask if you have any advice for someone who'd like to study mathematics on their own. I am a double major and don't have any hours left to dedicate to math courses, but my university has a math/science support center with tutors in mathematics at all levels, so I'd be able to get help there to clarify something that I did not understand through autodidactic study.

    Basically, I'm doing this for self intellectual enrichment and my lack of proficiency in mathematics is something I'd like to remedy from an intellectual standpoint

    What are some good books/resources I could purchase?

    I'd like to cover:

    Algebra
    Precalculus
    Differential and Integral Calculus

    and then make my way into university level math.

    I realize this in't a math question directly, but I hope some of you may be able to offer insight/specific resources.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
    Joined
    Mar 2010
    From
    Florida
    Posts
    3,093
    Thanks
    5
    Differential equations by Zill is easy to understand on your own.

    Calculus 9th Ed by Larson, Hostetler, and Edwards

    Schuams (I believe it is spelled) is supposed to be a good.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    MHF Contributor
    Prove It's Avatar
    Joined
    Aug 2008
    Posts
    11,569
    Thanks
    1427
    The "Demystified" series is pretty good.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    Senior Member
    Joined
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    470
    I have a feeling that this thread is going to get a lot of replies.

    One starting book for a beginning student that is fast paced, formal, and inspirational:
    http://www.amazon.com/Art-Problem-So.../dp/1885875010
    http://www.amazon.com/Art-Problem-So.../dp/1885875037

    Also:
    http://www.amazon.com/Mathematical-T.../dp/0130144126
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  5. #5
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    3
    Thanks so far guys!

    Keep them coming as I'd like to approach this from a multitude of angles, it'll definitely be interesting to plow through all of this on my own.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
    Rhymes with Orange Chris L T521's Avatar
    Joined
    May 2008
    From
    Chicago, IL
    Posts
    2,844
    Thanks
    3
    Quote Originally Posted by stephenk19 View Post
    I am a university student currently studying for a B.A, thus little math is required. I've never been historically great at math, I know basic arithmitic and have intermediate algebra down, but I'd really like to give myself a better understanding and perhaps reach higher levels of math by studying on my own. Therefore, I'd like to ask if you have any advice for someone who'd like to study mathematics on their own. I am a double major and don't have any hours left to dedicate to math courses, but my university has a math/science support center with tutors in mathematics at all levels, so I'd be able to get help there to clarify something that I did not understand through autodidactic study.

    Basically, I'm doing this for self intellectual enrichment and my lack of proficiency in mathematics is something I'd like to remedy from an intellectual standpoint

    What are some good books/resources I could purchase?

    I'd like to cover:

    Algebra
    Precalculus
    Differential and Integral Calculus

    and then make my way into university level math.

    I realize this in't a math question directly, but I hope some of you may be able to offer insight/specific resources.
    Look into Paul's Online Math Notes -- his note's are easy to follow and would be a good supplement to any book you're studying from!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  7. #7
    A Plied Mathematician
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    From
    CT, USA
    Posts
    6,318
    Thanks
    4
    Awards
    2
    I would highly recommend the following books by Morris Kline:

    1. Mathematics for the Nonmathematician (covers algebra, trig, and precalc).
    2. Calculus: An Intuitive and Physical Approach

    For DE's, I've been enjoying going through Zill's DE book (also recommended by dwsmith above) on my own. You might consider the Tenenbaum/Pollard book, as it is very inexpensive. Both Kline books are inexpensive, which is nice, and the quality is outstanding.

    Cheers.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  8. #8
    Newbie
    Joined
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    3
    I would highly recommend the following books by Morris Kline:

    1. Mathematics for the Nonmathematician (covers algebra, trig, and precalc).
    I just went and picked a few of these up this morning and this one really stood out from my brief exploration of it!

    This information has been really helpful. If anyone can think of something else, don't hesitate to post. There's no such thing as too many resources.

    Also, great news!

    My university accepts CLEP credits for the CLEP exam in College Algebra and Pre-Calc, so I'm giving myself eight months to go from intermediate algebra to the beginning of Calculus and then I'll devote some of what little electives I have left to either Calc I or II.

    A small question: After brushing up on my intermediate algebra and tackling College Algebra, is it advisable to study trig indepenently before beginning precalculus course?
    Last edited by stephenk19; January 10th 2011 at 09:03 AM. Reason: additional info.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  9. #9
    A Plied Mathematician
    Joined
    Jun 2010
    From
    CT, USA
    Posts
    6,318
    Thanks
    4
    Awards
    2
    After brushing up on my intermediate algebra and tackling College Algebra, is it advisable to study trig indepenently before beginning precalculus course?
    It's kind of 6 of one, a half-dozen of the other. Pre-Calc, in my mind, equals Algebra 3 + analytic geometry + trigonometry. Once you've studied all that, you're ready for calculus. At least, that's the way it is in the US. Are you in the US? In any case, my answer to your question would be probably a "no". You can study trig in your pre-calc class. That's the way I did it, anyway.

    Incidentally, if you have an edit to a post you want to make, and it's been a while since you made the post, you're probably better off with a new post in the same thread. That's a lot more visible than editing an old post. On the other hand, "bumping" is discouraged on this forum. A genuine addition to a post is not considered bumping.

    Cheers.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Should I buy maths books to teach myself maths.
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: November 21st 2011, 03:45 PM
  2. Replies: 0
    Last Post: May 22nd 2010, 07:04 AM
  3. math books?
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 28th 2010, 07:46 PM
  4. good math books
    Posted in the Math Challenge Problems Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: May 9th 2008, 11:17 PM
  5. Math books
    Posted in the Advanced Algebra Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: December 20th 2005, 02:22 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum