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Math Help - Mechanics

  1. #1
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    Mechanics



    Which is the right answer of R?

    Rcos27-85g=0
    R= 85g/cos27
    R= 935N

    or

    R-85gcos27=0
    R=85gcos27
    R= 742N

    Im bit confused. In M1, I was told to use the Second method, which is right for M1.
    But Im doing M2 atm, and the solution uses the first method.

    Can someone explain?

    Thanks for your help.
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  2. #2
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    R = mg\cos{\theta}
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  3. #3
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    So the second one is right?
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by BabyMilo View Post
    So the second one is right?
    if 85g is the weight of the mass, then R = 85g\cos(27^\circ)
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  5. #5
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    If you ever get confused, just remember that the normal force on a ramp cannot exceed the weight (unless something else is pushing it against the ramp).
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by skeeter View Post
    if 85g is the weight of the mass, then R = 85g\cos(27^\circ)
    what if there is a horizontal force of mw^2r?

    would R still be 85gcos27 ?

    thanks
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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by BabyMilo View Post
    what if there is a horizontal force of mw^2r?

    would R still be 85gcos27 ?

    thanks
    You are talking about centripedal force right? In that case 85g/cos27.

    Remember, if the block is sliding down the ramp, the force is pointing down (parallel) to the ramp. In this case, the force components perpendicular to the ramp should sum to zero. If you draw the free body diagram, you get R = 85gcos(27).

    If it is the angle of a ramp in a turn, then the force is horizontal (pointed directly towards the center of the circle). In this case, the vertical force components should sum to zero. If you draw the free body diagram, you get R = 85g/cos(27).

    Also, usually R means radius and not normal force. I would suggest changing the notation to avoid confusion.
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  8. #8
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    well we use r for radius instead of R.
    but thanks for you help.
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  9. #9
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    next time, post the entire problem.

    this image may help ...

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