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Math Help - Can someone explain the oxidation selection on calculating electrons as noted

  1. #1
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    Can someone explain the oxidation selection on calculating electrons as noted

    Ok. I am studying my notes and have a question on # of p,f and e.

    Atom of Nitrogen-14 = 14 over 7 N p=7 n=7 e=?
    net charge/oxdation 2,+-3,4,5

    Atom of Iron -256 = 56 over 26 FE p=26 n=30 e??
    net charge 2,3

    Atom of Uranium-256= 236 over 92 U p=92 n=144 e=
    net charge 3,4,5,6

    I am to write the nuclide symbol and state the number of p,n,e.
    Question I have is how do I know which charge to use to calculate the electrons?

    If there is a negative # I use that one, but if it's only positive, which one do I use like in U and Fe??
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  2. #2
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    You only need to vary the number of electrons.

    ^{14}_7 N^{3-} has 7 + 3 electrons (so that there are 3 more electrons than protons, thus a net charge of 3-)

    ^{14}_7 N^{3+} has 7 - 3 electrons (so that there are 3 less electrons than protons, thus a net charge of 3+)

    Try out the others now.
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  3. #3
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    In all atoms the number of electrons is equal to the number of protons. This holds for isotopes which only vary in terms of neutron number.

    Net charge = atomic number - number of electrons.

    For positive charges there are more protons than electrons and for negative there are more electrons. With regards to my first statement when there is a net charge the species is an ion


    Oxidation numbers are a different aspect of chemistry used in compounds, I do not understand what they have to do with the question here
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    Hi, OK I worded it wrong on saying oxidation numbers. It's ion which I understand. So if the net charge is + there will be less electrons. And if the net charge is - there will be more electrons correct?? I am just making sure I understand this.

    But I guess what I mean above is that if you have 3 net charges to select from. which one do you use? I an kinda unclear about that. I am looking at my notes in my book and I.
    Like the Uranimum. I can have 4 different electrons depending on the one I select? There is something simple here, but it's not clicking in my mind here.
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    Quote Originally Posted by bradycat View Post
    Hi, OK I worded it wrong on saying oxidation numbers. It's ion which I understand. So if the net charge is + there will be less electrons. And if the net charge is - there will be more electrons correct?? I am just making sure I understand this.
    Correct

    But I guess what I mean above is that if you have 3 net charges to select from. which one do you use? I an kinda unclear about that. I am looking at my notes in my book and I.
    Like the Uranimum. I can have 4 different electrons depending on the one I select? There is something simple here, but it's not clicking in my mind here.
    From reading the question I believe it's asking you to state the number of protons, neutrons and electrons in each case.
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