Results 1 to 2 of 2

Math Help - The Momentum Principle

  1. #1
    TGS
    TGS is offline
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Jun 2009
    Posts
    27

    The Momentum Principle

    I am completely lost... I don't really understand the momentum principle that well so I need someone to explain this to me.

    "A ball is kicked from a location < 8, 0, -7 > (on the ground) with initial velocity < -9, 16, -4 > m/s. The ball's speed is low enough that air resistance is negligible.
    What is the velocity of the ball 0.2 seconds after being kicked?"

    And this as well:

    "Now consider a different time interval: the interval between the initial kick and the moment when the ball reaches its highest point. We want to find how long it takes for the ball to reach this point, and how high the ball goes.
    What is the y-component of the ball's velocity at the instant when the ball reaches its highest point (the end of this time interval)?"
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
    skeeter's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    From
    North Texas
    Posts
    11,623
    Thanks
    428
    Quote Originally Posted by TGS View Post
    I am completely lost... I don't really understand the momentum principle that well so I need someone to explain this to me.

    "A ball is kicked from a location < 8, 0, -7 > (on the ground) with initial velocity < -9, 16, -4 > m/s. The ball's speed is low enough that air resistance is negligible.
    What is the velocity of the ball 0.2 seconds after being kicked?"

    And this as well:

    "Now consider a different time interval: the interval between the initial kick and the moment when the ball reaches its highest point. We want to find how long it takes for the ball to reach this point, and how high the ball goes.
    What is the y-component of the ball's velocity at the instant when the ball reaches its highest point (the end of this time interval)?"
    assuming that I have interpreted your given coordinates correctly ...

    in the vertical direction, the acceleration due to gravity is -9.8 \, m/s^2

    v(t) = <-9 \, , \, 16-9.8t \, , \, -4><br />

    at the top of its trajectory, v_y = 0

    position, r(t) = <8-9t \, , \, 16t-4.9t^2 \, , \, -7-4t>
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Well ordering principle and the maximum principle
    Posted in the Advanced Algebra Forum
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: August 3rd 2010, 08:31 AM
  2. Momentum Principle and Energy Principle Problem
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: October 4th 2009, 01:42 AM
  3. Momentum
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 19th 2009, 10:59 PM
  4. Momentum
    Posted in the Advanced Applied Math Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: April 8th 2008, 02:38 AM
  5. Momentum
    Posted in the Math Topics Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: October 27th 2007, 02:50 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum