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Math Help - Hydrogen burns...

  1. #1
    Member Mr Rayon's Avatar
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    Hydrogen burns...

    Hydrogen burns in oxygen to produce water.
    a) Write a balanced equation for this reaction.

    I got:

    2H_2 (g) + O_2 (g) ---> 2H_2O (l)

    however, in the answers it says

    2H_2 (g) + O_2 (g) ---> 2H_2O (g)

    - the difference being that the water is in a gaseous state rather than liquid. My question is, how do you know for sure to put (g) after water in the right hand side of the equation? How do we know it remains a gas? When I think of H_2O I think of it in its liquid form.
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  2. #2
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    e^(i*pi)'s Avatar
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    It's something you have to learn really.

    It is in a gas phase because the reaction between hydrogen and oxygen is highly exothermic and the heat generated is enough to ensure the water is gaseous. Of course it will condense in due course
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  3. #3
    Flow Master
    mr fantastic's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mr Rayon View Post
    Hydrogen burns in oxygen to produce water.
    a) Write a balanced equation for this reaction.

    I got:

    2H_2 (g) + O_2 (g) ---> 2H_2O (l)

    however, in the answers it says

    2H_2 (g) + O_2 (g) ---> 2H_2O (g)

    - the difference being that the water is in a gaseous state rather than liquid. My question is, how do you know for sure to put (g) after water in the right hand side of the equation? How do we know it remains a gas? When I think of H_2O I think of it in its liquid form.
    It's best to post chemistry questions here: http://www.chemistryhelpforum.com/chemistry-help/
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