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Math Help - Series

  1. #1
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Series

    If you have seen this one before, please refrain from posting the solution too soon. Please give the others some time before posting the answer.

    Okay, I have three numbers that I am listing as a series: 2, 4, and 8. What I want you to do is give me three more numbers that fit the pattern. You have to give me the rule you used in finding these extra numbers. If your three numbers fit the pattern I am using you've won! If not I'll let you know.

    -Dan
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    Re: Series

    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
    If you have seen this one before, please refrain from posting the solution too soon. Please give the others some time before posting the answer.

    Okay, I have three numbers that I am listing as a series: 2, 4, and 8. What I want you to do is give me three more numbers that fit the pattern. You have to give me the rule you used in finding these extra numbers. If your three numbers fit the pattern I am using you've won! If not I'll let you know.

    -Dan
    What exactly is meant by the term "series"? In mathematics, a series typically means the sum of the elements of a sequence. So, are you listing three numbers that begin a finite sequence (and you are using the term series, since it is considered a synonym in the English language)? Or does this puzzle involve some summation of some kind?
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    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Re: Series

    Quote Originally Posted by SlipEternal View Post
    What exactly is meant by the term "series"? In mathematics, a series typically means the sum of the elements of a sequence. So, are you listing three numbers that begin a finite sequence (and you are using the term series, since it is considered a synonym in the English language)? Or does this puzzle involve some summation of some kind?
    Good point. This is actually more of a logic puzzle. Let's try this. I have 3 numbers that fit a certain rule: 2, 4, and 8. The goal is for you to provide three more numbers that also fit this rule. You may have a correct set of three numbers but you need to also have the same rule that I am using. For example the first numbers that people try is 16, 64, 128 using the rule is that all numbers are a power of 2. Those three numbers actually do fit my rule, but powers of 2 is not the rule I am using.

    -Dan
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    Re: Series

    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
    If you have seen this one before, please refrain from posting the solution too soon. Please give the others some time before posting the answer.
    Have a look at this.
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    Re: Series

    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    nah it's none of them
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    Re: Series

    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    It could be any of them or none of them. I seriously doubt that there are any series in that list that would match my rule. Think outside the box and take a shot at it.

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    Re: Series

    its 14 22 32

    as 4-2=2
    8-4=4
    14-8=6
    22-14=8
    32-22=10

    in general t(n)-t(n-1)= even number or multiple of 2
    for ist term=2*1
    for 2nd term=2*2
    and so on
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    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Re: Series

    Quote Originally Posted by prasum View Post
    its 14 22 32

    as 4-2=2
    8-4=4
    14-8=6
    22-14=8
    32-22=10

    in general t(n)-t(n-1)= even number or multiple of 2
    for ist term=2*1
    for 2nd term=2*2
    and so on
    Those numbers fit my pattern, but that is not the rule that I'm using.

    -Dan
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    Re: Series

    is it
    2+2=4

    4+4=8

    8+ 6=14

    14+8=22

    22+10=32

    we skip 2 and add it to next no in pattern
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    Re: Series

    If the sequence is an and a_1=2, a_2=4, a_3=8 then the rule I choose to apply is \{a_n \}= \{2,4,8,-1,2.5,\pi \}
    There is nothing to infer from the first 3 numbers as we can only speculate, the next numbers in the sequence according to the rule I speculated are -1, 2.5, pi
    Last edited by Shakarri; April 19th 2014 at 10:17 AM.
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    Re: Series

    If the president of the United States serves 2 4-year terms, he serves a total of 8 years. If a congressman in the House of Representatives serves 4 6-year terms, he will serve a total of 24 years, so I guess 4, 6, 24.
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    Re: Series

    The two of you have correct numbers, but that is not my rule.

    I'd drag this out further because I'm evil, but there seems to be little point.

    Solution: My pattern is three numbers in numerical sequence. ie. 2, 4, 6 and 6, 7, 1000000 hold with the pattern whereas 10, pi, 1 do not.

    The whole point of this is that people, even in the Math or Science community, have a tendency to not deal with other options if they think they see a pattern. (I guess it works better in person than it does on the forum.)

    -Dan
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    Re: Series

    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
    The two of you have correct numbers, but that is not my rule.

    I'd drag this out further because I'm evil, but there seems to be little point.

    Solution: My pattern is three numbers in numerical sequence. ie. 2, 4, 6 and 6, 7, 1000000 hold with the pattern whereas 10, pi, 1 do not.

    The whole point of this is that people, even in the Math or Science community, have a tendency to not deal with other options if they think they see a pattern. (I guess it works better in person than it does on the forum.)

    -Dan
    You've basically got us pulling guesses from thin air. We've got no reason to believe any rule is any more likely to be correct than Shakarri's in post #9.
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    Re: Series

    Quote Originally Posted by topsquark View Post
    The two of you have correct numbers, but that is not my rule.

    I'd drag this out further because I'm evil, but there seems to be little point.

    Solution: My pattern is three numbers in numerical sequence. ie. 2, 4, 6 and 6, 7, 1000000 hold with the pattern whereas 10, pi, 1 do not.

    The whole point of this is that people, even in the Math or Science community, have a tendency to not deal with other options if they think they see a pattern. (I guess it works better in person than it does on the forum.)

    -Dan
    You mean the rule you used was that the numbers were increasing? I think the problem for me was that I did not understand that as people added three numbers, it would give additional information (any rule I thought about would have to incorporate the possibility of their three numbers as part of your pattern). That actually sounds like it could be a fun puzzle. It is like a mathematical brain teaser. Can we try another one where we all come into it with the knowledge that as we guess, we are getting more clues as to what your rule is?
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    Re: Series

    Thanks prasum for your help.
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