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Math Help - Text directly over objects

  1. #1
    MHF Contributor Mathstud28's Avatar
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    Text directly over objects

    I know how to do things like \overbrace{\longrightarrow}^{\text{yay!}}...but how would I do this \longrightarrow^{\text{yay!}} but have it centered over the arrow. Same thing for something under like \max\left(\xi\right)_{x\in(-1,1)}
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  2. #2
    Rhymes with Orange Chris L T521's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathstud28 View Post
    I know how to do things like \overbrace{\longrightarrow}^{\text{yay!}}...but how would I do this \longrightarrow^{\text{yay!}} but have it centered over the arrow. Same thing for something under like \max\left(\xi\right)_{x\in(-1,1)}
    Try \xrightarrow{yay!} ... \xrightarrow{yay!}

    The general syntax is \xrightarrow[subscript]{superscript} (also works for \xleftarrow)
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  3. #3
    MHF Contributor Mathstud28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris L T521 View Post
    Try \xrightarrow{yay!} ... \xrightarrow{yay!}

    The general syntax is \xrightarrow[subscript]{superscript} (also works for \xleftarrow)
    \xrightarrow{\text{yay!}}

    \xmax[x\in(-1,1)]

    \xrightarrow[\text{yay!}]

    It does not work for non-arrows? And I cannot seem to get the text under the arrow.
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  4. #4
    Rhymes with Orange Chris L T521's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mathstud28 View Post
    \xrightarrow{\text{yay!}}

    \xmax[x\in(-1,1)]

    \xrightarrow[\text{yay!}]{}

    It does not work for non-arrows? And I cannot seem to get the text under the arrow.
    Fixed the third one... it should be \xrightarrow[\text{yay!}]{}

    For the second one, use the \limits command: \max\limits_{x\in(-1,1)} gives you \max\limits_{x\in(-1,1)}.
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  5. #5
    Super Member flyingsquirrel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Chris L T521 View Post
    For the second one, use the \limits command: \max\limits_{x\in(-1,1)} gives you \max\limits_{x\in(-1,1)}.
    Why do you use the \limits command, Chris ? \max_{x\in(-1,1)} gives \max_{x\in(-1,1)} too.
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  6. #6
    MHF Contributor Mathstud28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by flyingsquirrel View Post
    Why do you use the \limits command, Chris ? \max_{x\in(-1,1)} gives \max_{x\in(-1,1)} too.
    \max_{x\in(-1,1)}(\xi)

    Thank you Flyingsquirrel, the problem was the order I was writing. I was writing [tex]\max(\xi)_{x\in(-1,1)}[/tex]
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  7. #7
    Moo
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    \stackrel{yup}{\longrightarrow}

    \stackrel{yup}{\longrightarrow}
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  8. #8
    MHF Contributor Mathstud28's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moo View Post
    \stackrel{yup}{\longrightarrow}

    \stackrel{yup}{\longrightarrow}
    \stackrel{\stackrel{thank}{you}}{\longrightarrow}
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  9. #9
    Moo
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    \stackrel{\displaystyle{\stackrel{thank}{you}}}{\l  ongrightarrow}

    does it look better ?
    It depends on how you want to use it, \displaystyle looks more useful for a three lines stuff.
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  10. #10
    Super Member flyingsquirrel's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Moo View Post
    \displaystyle looks more useful for a three lines stuff.
    \substack gives a nice result : \stackrel{\substack{\text{a two lines}\\ \text{stuff} }}{\longrightarrow}, \stackrel{\substack{\text{and a } \\ \text{three lines}\\ \text{stuff} }}{\longrightarrow}.

    To write the whole proof over the arrow, use Chris' solution : f(x)\xrightarrow[x\to0]{\text{Let }\varepsilon>0.\,\text{According to the previous lemma, if one lets}\,\delta=\ldots }\pi.
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