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Math Help - tesseract

  1. #1
    Junior Member NowIsForever's Avatar
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    tesseract

    If you wanted to understand the tesseract, how would you start? What books would you read? What subjects would you study?

    I presume someone has made a good start in the understanding of this subject. What have they written? What prerequisites are required to understand this work?
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  2. #2
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    Re: tesseract

    Tesseract is also called regular octachoron or cubic prism, is most the four-dimensional analog of the cube and the tesseract is to the cube as the cube is to the square. Just as the surface of the cube consists of most 6 square faces and the hypersurface of the tesseract consists of 8 cubical cells.
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  3. #3
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    Re: tesseract

    If you have interest in the tesseract, I can recommend a wonderful short story by Robert Heinlein called "And he built a crooked house". If you search for it you should find the text online.
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  4. #4
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    Re: tesseract

    Hello, grillage!

    Yes, I highly recommend reading "And he built a crooked house" by Robert Heinlein.

    It was in an anthology titled "The Mathematical Magpie" by Clifton Fadiman.
    Also included were fanciful stories involving the Moebius strip, the Klein bottle,
    and other geometric anomolies.
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  5. #5
    Forum Admin topsquark's Avatar
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    Re: tesseract

    Also try "Flatland: A Romance of Many Dimensions" by Edwin Abbot Abbot. (Yes, that's his real name.) It gives insight about how to view from a 2D world to a 3D world, but it gives good lessons to use to go from 3D to 4D.

    -Dan
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