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Math Help - Bermuda Circle?

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    Bermuda Circle?

    There is an area of the sea known as the "Bermuda Triandle." In the Bermuda Triangle, it is rumoured that storms arrive out of nowhere, navigation equipment doesn't work correctly, and ships vanish without a trace.

    The Bermuda Triangle is between Puerto Rico, Miami, and Bermuda. It should be noted that Pueto Rico and Miami are 240 kilometers apart, Miami and Bermuda are 330 kilometers apart, and Puerto Rico and Bermuda are 270 kilometers apart. The Bermuda Triangle, according to legend, is defined as the largest possible circle that fits entirely within the triangle formed by those three islands.

    What is the area of the Bermuda Triangle (or circle), in square kilometers?
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    Quote Originally Posted by DumbGenius View Post
    There is an area of the sea known as the "Bermuda Triandle." In the Bermuda Triangle, it is rumoured that storms arrive out of nowhere, navigation equipment doesn't work correctly, and ships vanish without a trace.

    The Bermuda Triangle is between Puerto Rico, Miami, and Bermuda. It should be noted that Pueto Rico and Miami are 240 kilometers apart, Miami and Bermuda are 330 kilometers apart, and Puerto Rico and Bermuda are 270 kilometers apart. The Bermuda Triangle, according to legend, is defined as the largest possible circle that fits entirely within the triangle formed by those three islands.

    What is the area of the Bermuda Triangle (or circle), in square kilometers?
    It seems to me that the largest circle is the inscribed circle.
    There is an element theorem that says,
    r=A/s
    Where r is the radius of that circle.
    A is the area of triangle
    s is semi-perimeter.

    The perimeter is easy, 840 thus semi-perimeter is 420.
    The area is calulated with Heron's Theorem:
    A^2=420(420-330)(420-270)(420-240)
    A^2=420(90)(150)(180)
    A^2=(10)^4*(42)(9)(15)(18)
    A=31947 (approximately)
    Thus,
    r=31947/420=76 kilometers.

    The area of the circle is,
    pi(76)^2=18176 km^2
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    so on this end formula, do I gotta divide one side by the other or is this the answer. and what exactly is the carrots signs that're before the 2s?

    The area of the circle is,
    pi(76)^2=18176 km^2
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    Quote Originally Posted by DumbGenius View Post
    so on this end formula, do I gotta divide one side by the other or is this the answer. and what exactly is the carrots signs that're before the 2s?

    pi(76)^2=18176 km^2
    This is your answer.
    As to the carots (or however you spell that) the area of the circle is:
    76^2 \pi = 18176 \, km^2

    We didn't have LaTeX working then... The symbol x^2 means x^2.

    -Dan
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    thanks a lot guys,i had to stay after in school to get this finished with all the work and such. you guys definitely helped me out a lot
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