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Math Help - The pythagorean theory

  1. #1
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    The pythagorean theory

    I'm unsure on how to do this find the unknown side to one decimal:


    I'm also unsure on how to determine whether these sides of a triangle makes it a right angle:

    22 in., 24 in., and 32 in.

    Can someone help me in laymen terms? lol
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  2. #2
    Senior Member euclid2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladyk View Post
    I'm unsure on how to do this find the unknown side to one decimal:


    I'm also unsure on how to determine whether these sides of a triangle makes it a right angle:

    22 in., 24 in., and 32 in.

    Can someone help me in laymen terms? lol
    a^2+b^2=c^2
    12^2+10^2=c^2
    144+100=c^2
    244=c^2
    \sqrt244=c
    15.6=c

    Note: Pythagorean Theorem
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  3. #3
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    I understand everything except for the 15.6 part. Why would it be that? I know I need to know that in order to figure out the answer to the second aprt of my question.
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  4. #4
    Senior Member euclid2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladyk View Post
    I understand everything except for the 15.6 part. Why would it be that? I know I need to know that in order to figure out the answer to the second aprt of my question.
    In order to get rid of the  ^2 on  c^2
    we must take the square root on the other side

    hence getting rid of  ^2 on  c^2

    take the square root  \sqrt{244} = 15.6

    Do you understand better now?

    Take a look at this(specifically example 1) http://regentsprep.org/regents/Math/fpyth/Pythag.htm

    They have arranged it difference but it is the same.
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  5. #5
    Senior Member euclid2's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by ladyk View Post
    I'm unsure on how to do this find the unknown side to one decimal:


    I'm also unsure on how to determine whether these sides of a triangle makes it a right angle:

    22 in., 24 in., and 32 in.

    Can someone help me in laymen terms? lol
    To find if it is a right triangle, the hypotenuse has to be the longest side.

     c^2 = a^2 + b^2

     32^2?22^2+24^2

     1024?484+576

     1024 does not  = 1060

    Therefore, it is not a right triangle.
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by euclid2 View Post
    In order to get rid of the  ^2 on  c^2
    we must take the square root on the other side

    hence getting rid of  ^2 on  c^2

    take the square root  \sqrt{244} = 15.6

    Do you understand better now?

    Take a look at this(specifically example 1) Pythagorean Theorem

    They have arranged it difference but it is the same.
    I completely understand. I went to this site to get a better understanding:

    http://www.nutshellmath.com/textbook...triangles.html
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