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Math Help - [SOLVED] Help with Geometry homework. Triangles.

  1. #1
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    Exclamation [SOLVED] Help with Geometry homework. Triangles.

    I was currently working on problems that involve triangles. I am really confused on how to solve these. Teacher did not give sufficient information on how I could go about to solve this problem.

    Here is an example of a problem.=

    Each set of numbers below represents the lengths of three line segments.
    Which set represent line segments that could be connected to form a triangle?

    Then I am given a set of numbers.

    Here is an example=

    (3, 5, 7)=How would I know whether I connect them to form a triangle?

    (3, 4, 8)=How would I know whether I connect them to form a triangle?

    (1, 4, 6)=??-

    (1, 3, 5)=??-

    (5, 6, 11)=??-

    (1, 10, 20)=??-

    I do not want the answer. I just need some hints in the right direction on how to solve a problem of this kind. You may use this one as an example.



    How would I go about to solve this kind of question? I have more than one question on these to answer.

    Thanks for all the potential help.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinVM20 View Post
    I was currently working on problems that involve triangles. I am really confused on how to solve these. Teacher did not give sufficient information on how I could go about to solve this problem.

    Here is an example of a problem.=

    Each set of numbers below represents the lengths of three line segments.
    Which set represent line segments that could be connected to form a triangle?

    Then I am given a set of numbers.

    Here is an example=

    (3, 5, 7)=How would I know whether I connect them to form a triangle?

    (3, 4, 8)=How would I know whether I connect them to form a triangle?

    (1, 4, 6)=??-

    (1, 3, 5)=??-

    (5, 6, 11)=??-

    (1, 10, 20)=??-

    I do not want the answer. I just need some hints in the right direction on how to solve a problem of this kind. You may use this one as an example.



    How would I go about to solve this kind of question? I have more than one question on these to answer.

    Thanks for all the potential help.

    Use the pythagorean theorem

    A triangle is a right triangle if and only if a^2+b^2=c^2

    remember c is the hypotenuse(the longest side)

    I hope this helps good luck.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinVM20 View Post
    Each set of numbers below represents the lengths of three line segments. Which set represent line segments that could be connected to form a triangle? Here is an example=
    (3, 5, 7)=How would I know whether I connect them to form a triangle?
    (3, 4, 8)=How would I know whether I connect them to form a triangle?
    (1, 4, 6)=??-
    (1, 3, 5)=??-
    (5, 6, 11)=??-
    (1, 10, 20)=??-.
    Quote Originally Posted by TheEmptySet View Post
    Use the Pythagorean theorem.
    I fear that TheEmptySet came up really empty on this one.
    The Pythagorean theorem has very little to do with this problem.
    The problem involves the triangle inequality: the sum of the lengths of any two sides of a triangle must exceed the length of the third side.
    From the problem, the triple (1, 4, 6) cannot be a triangle because 1+4\le 6, i.e. does not exceed.
    Now do that for each triple. Be careful! In first one we must test all three pairs.
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  4. #4
    Behold, the power of SARDINES!
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    I fear that TheEmptySet came up really empty on this one.
    The Pythagorean theorem has very little to do with this problem.
    The problem involves the triangle inequality: the sum of the lengths of any two sides of a triangle must exceed the length of the third side.
    From the problem, the triple (1, 4, 6) cannot be a triangle because 1+4\le 6, i.e. does not exceed.
    Now do that for each triple. Be careful! In first one we must test all three pairs.
    WOW my mistake...

    What I said would only apply to right triangles....

    Thanks Plato
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  5. #5
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    Thanks Plato. I was able to solve the problems.


    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    I fear that TheEmptySet came up really empty on this one.
    The Pythagorean theorem has very little to do with this problem.
    The problem involves the triangle inequality: the sum of the lengths of any two sides of a triangle must exceed the length of the third side.
    From the problem, the triple (1, 4, 6) cannot be a triangle because 1+4\le 6, i.e. does not exceed.
    Now do that for each triple. Be careful! In first one we must test all three pairs.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by KevinVM20 View Post
    I was currently working on problems that involve triangles. I am really confused on how to solve these. Teacher did not give sufficient information on how I could go about to solve this problem.

    Here is an example of a problem.=

    Each set of numbers below represents the lengths of three line segments.
    Which set represent line segments that could be connected to form a triangle?

    Then I am given a set of numbers.

    Here is an example=

    (3, 5, 7)=How would I know whether I connect them to form a triangle?

    (3, 4, 8)=How would I know whether I connect them to form a triangle?

    (1, 4, 6)=??-

    (1, 3, 5)=??-

    (5, 6, 11)=??-

    (1, 10, 20)=??-

    I do not want the answer. I just need some hints in the right direction on how to solve a problem of this kind. You may use this one as an example.



    How would I go about to solve this kind of question? I have more than one question on these to answer.

    Thanks for all the potential help.
    For a triangle, the sum of two smaller sides must be greater than the third side. If it is not, then, there does not form any triangle.

    In (3, 5, 7) see that 3+5 = 8 >7 so they form a triangle.

    In (3, 4, 7) see that 3+4=7 which is not greater than third side 7(it is same as 7). So no triangle forms.

    In (1,4, 6) see the sum 1+4=5<6, so no triangle.

    You got it now?
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