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Thread: Water pipe...

  1. #1
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    Water pipe...

    Came across this annoying problem:

    Determine amt. (gal.) of water per hr. delivered through a 6" pipe, inside diameter 6.065".
    Water travels at 10' per sec. 1 gallon = 231 cu. in.

    Anybody understand it?

    I ended up with ~54,000 gal. per hr.
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  2. #2
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    Re: Water pipe...

    Here are my calculations:

    The cross-sectional area of water is:

    $$\pi\cdot \left( \dfrac{6.065}{2}\right)^2 \text{ in}^2$$

    Area times positional velocity gives volume per time:

    $$\pi\cdot \left(\dfrac{6.065}{2}\right)^2\text{ in}^2\cdot \left(10\text{ ft/sec}\right)\cdot \left(12\text{ in/ft}\right) \cdot \left( 3600\text{ sec/hr}\right) \cdot \left( 1/231\text{ gal/in}^3 \right) \approx 54,000 \text{ gal/hr}$$

    I get the same answer as you.
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  3. #3
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    Re: Water pipe...

    Phewww.....thanks Slip!!!
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  4. #4
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    Re: Water pipe...

    Quote Originally Posted by DenisB View Post
    Came across this annoying problem:

    Determine amt. (gal.) of water per hr. delivered through a 6" pipe, inside diameter 6.065".
    Water travels at 10' per sec. 1 gallon = 231 cu. in.

    Anybody understand it?

    I ended up with ~54,000 gal. per hr.
    How can a 6" pipe have an inside diameter larger than 6"?
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  5. #5
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    Re: Water pipe...

    Quote Originally Posted by Debsta View Post
    How can a 6" pipe have an inside diameter larger than 6"?
    The pipe is called a 6" pipe. But, in reality, it is slightly larger than 6" in diameter. This is common where companies will round measurements to the nearest unit rather than display an actual measurement. $6\approx 6.065$.
    Thanks from Debsta
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