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Math Help - Physics/geometry

  1. #1
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    Physics/geometry

    A geosynchronous satellite is stationary over a point on the equator (zero degrees latitude) at the same longitude as Seattle, Washington. Seattle's latitude is 47.6. If you want to communicate with the satellite, at what angle above the horizon must you point your communication device? The Earth's radius is 6.3810^6 m. The orbital radius of a geosynchronous satellite was found in a previous problem (you can also calculate it using the mass of the Earth: 5.9710^24 kg). Hint: You will also need the law of sines and the law of cosines.

    The orbital radius of a geosynchronous is 3.58e7 meters.

    Thanks!
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  2. #2
    Grand Panjandrum
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    Quote Originally Posted by Linnus View Post
    A geosynchronous satellite is stationary over a point on the equator (zero degrees latitude) at the same longitude as Seattle, Washington. Seattle's latitude is 47.6. If you want to communicate with the satellite, at what angle above the horizon must you point your communication device? The Earth's radius is 6.3810^6 m. The orbital radius of a geosynchronous satellite was found in a previous problem (you can also calculate it using the mass of the Earth: 5.9710^24 kg). Hint: You will also need the law of sines and the law of cosines.

    The orbital radius of a geosynchronous is 3.58e7 meters.

    Thanks!
    First draw a labled diagram, such as that in the attachment.

    Now can you solve it?

    RonL
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Physics/geometry-gash.jpg  
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