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Math Help - circumference of the Earth

  1. #1
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    circumference of the Earth

    Can anyone tell me how to set up the equation to find out how far it is around the Earth at the Equator? Tomorow I have to mail off a PHS 111 lab that is due, so any immediate help anyone could offer would be greatly appreciated. THANKS!!!!!!!!
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    is up to his old tricks again! Jhevon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan Campbell View Post
    Can anyone tell me how to set up the equation to find out how far it is around the Earth at the Equator? Tomorow I have to mail off a PHS 111 lab that is due, so any immediate help anyone could offer would be greatly appreciated. THANKS!!!!!!!!
    we would need to know the radius of the earth. was that given to you?

    when you find the radius use the following formula for the circumference:

    \mbox { Circumference } = 2 \pi r, where r is the radius


    According to google, the radius of the Earth is 6378.1 km

    So, \mbox { Circumference } = 2 (6378.1) \pi = 12756.2 \pi \approx 40074.78 \mbox { km}
    Last edited by Jhevon; June 25th 2007 at 09:14 PM.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Susan Campbell View Post
    Can anyone tell me how to set up the equation to find out how far it is around the Earth at the Equator? Tomorow I have to mail off a PHS 111 lab that is due, so any immediate help anyone could offer would be greatly appreciated. THANKS!!!!!!!!
    Hello,

    you can use another method:

    If you know the distance between 2 points on a circle of longitude or the equator then you can calculate the circumference by:

    d : difference of degrees
    D: distance between the 2 points in km

    then

    c = \frac{360^\circ}{d} \cdot D

    Example:
    First point on the equator at 10W
    Second Point on the equator at 16 W
    Distance 667.9 km

    c = \frac{360^\circ}{6^\circ} \cdot 667.9\ km = 40074 \ km
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