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Math Help - Mathematics Sets

  1. #1
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    Mathematics Sets

    Help required1

    Can anyone with help me with mathematics sets/
    How can I determine the type of relationships in sets such as equivalence, inverse, reflexive, symmetrical and transitive?
    here is ab example X = {1,2,3}
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  2. #2
    MHF Contributor Swlabr's Avatar
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    Sets in themselves do not have "equivalence" or "inverses", and they cannot be "reflexive", "symmetrical" or "transitive". We must take the set under a relation. For instance, let us examine the set you have given under the relation "=". Clearly, for a,b,c \in X we have that a=a (reflexive), if a=b then b=a (symmetric), and if a=b and b=c then a=c. Thus, "=" is called an equivalence relation (an absurdly simple example, I know).

    I'm not entirely sure what you mean by inverses. If we take a set under an operation, for instance the set \{0,1,2\} under addition modulo 3 then you have an identity element, 0 (an identity element is a neutral element - a*id=id*a=a \text{ } \forall \text{ } a \in S), and every element has an inverse (an element that will take the element back to the inverse): the inverse of 1 is 2 and the inverse of 2 is 1 as 1+2=2+1=3 \equiv 0 \text{ mod } 3.

    Is that what you are looking for?
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