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Math Help - SETS - (k+1)-element subset S

  1. #1
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    SETS - (k+1)-element subset S

    There is a natural number k. Prove that from any set consisting of integer numbers that has more than 3^k elements we can take a subset S that has (k+1) elements and:
    For any two different subsets A, B \subseteq S the sum of all elements of set A is different from the sum of all elements of set B. (We assume that the sum of all elements of an empty set equals 0).

    I would be really grateful if anyone could help me with this assignment.
    Last edited by PaulinaAnna; September 8th 2010 at 08:45 AM.
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  2. #2
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    Maybe we can try to prove it inductively...

    But I don't know how do get down to it anyway.
    Last edited by PaulinaAnna; September 11th 2010 at 08:36 AM.
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