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Math Help - Room assignments

  1. #1
    Member oldguynewstudent's Avatar
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    Room assignments

    Last problem of the semester! Could someone let me know if the following is correct?
    Thanks

    A university has 120 incoming freshman that still have to be assigned to on-campus housing. The only remaining dorm holds 105 students and contains 42 doubles and seven triples. In how many ways can the university select 105 students to house in this dorm and then arrange those students into roommate pairs and triples, without yet assigning them to rooms?

    \left({120\atop 105}\right)*\left({105\atop 2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,  2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,3}\r  ight)
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  2. #2
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    Hello, oldguynewstudent!


    I agree with your reasoning and your answer.



    A university has 120 incoming freshman that will be assigned to on-campus housing.
    The only remaining dorm holds 105 students and contains 42 doubles and 7 triples.
    In how many ways can the university select 105 students to house in this dorm
    and then arrange those students into roommate pairs and triples?

    \left({120\atop 105}\right)\!\cdot\!\left({105\atop 2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,  2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,2,3,3,3,3,3,3,3}\r  ight)

    First, choose 105 from the 120 incoming freshmen.

    . . \dfrac{120!}{105!\,15!}} ways.


    Second, partition the 105 students into 42 pairs and 7 triples.

    . . \dfrac{105!}{(2!)^{42}(3!)^7} ways.


    Finally, the answer is the product of the two quantities above.



    I'll let you crank out the answer . . . I'll wait in the car.
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  3. #3
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    Soroban, did you notice the phrase "without yet assigning them to rooms?"
    It seems to me to mean unordered partitions.
    The answer you gave is for ordered partitions.
    That is assigning them to rooms.

    I do not understand oldguynewstudent's notation.
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  4. #4
    Member oldguynewstudent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    Soroban, did you notice the phrase "without yet assigning them to rooms?"
    It seems to me to mean unordered partitions.
    The answer you gave is for ordered partitions.
    That is assigning them to rooms.

    I do not understand oldguynewstudent's notation.
    I am thinking of this as distributing identical housing to distinct students. The identical housing comes in groups but we haven't specified which group is which yet.

    The notation is a multinomial notation, like binomial but with multiple groups. Does that make sense? BTW, I want to thank you for all the wonderful help you have given me so far. (Gesturing "I'm not worthy!")
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    How does one calculate \binom{10}{2,3.5}?
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  6. #6
    Member oldguynewstudent's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    How does one calculate \binom{10}{2,3.5}?
    10!/(2!3!5!)
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  7. #7
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    For any n\geq0,

    \left(x_{1}+x_{2}+...+x_{k}\right)^{n} =\sum\left({n\atop t_{1},t_{2},...,t_{k}}\right)x_{1}^{t_{1}}x_{2}^{t  _{2}}...x_{k}^{t_{k}} where the sum is over all k-lists \left(t_{1},t_{2},...,t_{k}\right) of nonnegative integers that sum to n.
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  8. #8
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    So that is the number of ways to divide 10 students into a group of 2, a group of 3 and a group of 5.
    Well how many of ways to divide 18 students into three groups of 2 and two groups of 6?
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  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    Soroban, did you notice the phrase "without yet assigning them to rooms?"
    It seems to me to mean unordered partitions.
    The answer you gave is for ordered partitions.
    That is assigning them to rooms.

    You're right, Plato! . . .I missed the significance of that phrase.


    My number: . \dfrac{105!}{(2!)^{42}(3!)^7} .is the number of ordered partitions.


    To un-order them, we would divide by (42!)(7!)

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