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Math Help - Help with Sequencesa and summations.

  1. #1
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    Help with Sequencesa and summations.

    Having a hard time figuring out how best to do this problem. I do not want the answer, just a good shove in the right direction and as much explanation as possible thanks. This is one of the toughest courses I have taken so I'll be around a lot until it ends. Thanks much.

    Not sure how I am suppose to use the first formula from a previous exercise to help with the 2nd.

    Help with Sequencesa and summations.-discrete.jpg
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickolase View Post
    Having a hard time figuring out how best to do this problem. I do not want the answer, just a good shove in the right direction
    Just carefully write all six terms, using brackets, in \sum\limits_{k = 1}^6 {\frac{1}<br />
{{k(k + 1)}}}  = \sum\limits_{k = 1}^6 {\left[ {\frac{1}{k} - \frac{1}<br />
{{k + 1}}} \right]} .
    Then remove the brackets. See what happens.
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  3. #3
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    Very quick reply, thanks very much. I believe I can work it from there, or at least hope so.

    P.S. How do you write the symbols in the message body so easily?
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nickolase View Post
    P.S. How do you write the symbols in the message body so easily?
    Learn to post in symbols? You can use LaTeX tags.
    [tex]\dfrac{d^2y}{dx^2}[/tex] gives \dfrac{d^2y}{dx^2}.
    Last edited by Plato; July 5th 2010 at 02:44 PM.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    Just carefully write all six terms, using brackets, in \sum\limits_{k = 1}^6 {\frac{1}<br />
{{k(k + 1)}}}  = \sum\limits_{k = 1}^6 {\left[ {\frac{1}{k} - \frac{1}<br />
{{k + 1}}} \right]} .
    Then remove the brackets. See what happens.
    Thanks Plato. Big help. Such a helpful forum.
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