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Math Help - How to distinguish in First Order Logic if I have to use an exclusive OR or not.

  1. #1
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    How to distinguish in First Order Logic if I have to use an exclusive OR or not.

    I am being told that:

    Adam or Mary are home, in spite of Dog1 and Dog2 not being happy.

    How should I translate this as a First Order Logic sentence?
    I don't know whenever to consider
    Adam or Mary are home
    as a "regular" or, or an exclusive or.

    Also, should I consider the case that both Dog1 and Dog2 are unhappy? Or must always at least (and at most) one of them to be happy?

    Thanks
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  2. #2
    Member Haven's Avatar
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    The "or" of natural language tends to be the exclusive or.

    e.g., Either John or Mary is home.

    However, in this case it seems that it may be using the inclusive or. The clue to me is use of the word "are". If we are using exclusive or, we would say "is", like written in the example above.
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