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Math Help - A push in the right direction.

  1. #1
    No one in Particular VonNemo19's Avatar
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    A push in the right direction.

    Hey everybody.

    I need to learn sets, logic, and axiomatic theoy. Where should I start?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by VonNemo19 View Post
    I need to learn sets, logic, and axiomatic theoy. Where should I start?
    If I were you, I would begin with a good readable Discrete Mathematics textbook by: Goodaire or Kenneth Ross. There are dozens of such texts but those two readable and have very standard notation. Then I would find a good set theory text such as ELEMENTS OF SET THEORY by Herbert Enderton. That is an older text but again very readable.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by VonNemo19 View Post
    Hey everybody.

    I need to learn sets, logic, and axiomatic theoy. Where should I start?
    I have not taken any course on the above. I am currently reading a book on set theory, and another book on logic. The predicate calculus on the logic is somewhat interesting, but in general logic is a bit too dry. The section on quantifiers is overwhelming. Perhaps, it's just because I am swallowing the book too quickly without ruminating. So far, I sort of know what they are all about, but not enough to do me any good.

    From what I see, you can learn set theory and logic at the same time. I don't know what axiomatic theory is.

    This is an interesting question you are asking. I didn't think an expert like would ask a question like this.
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    If I were you, I would begin with a good readable Discrete Mathematics textbook by: Goodaire or Kenneth Ross. There are dozens of such texts but those two readable and have very standard notation. Then I would find a good set theory text such as ELEMENTS OF SET THEORY by Herbert Enderton. That is an older text but again very readable.
    Plato,

    Is Discrete Mathematics textbook by: Goodaire or Kenneth Ross easy to follow. Does it have lots of examples and exercises? What other discrete math books have you used?
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    Quote Originally Posted by novice View Post
    Is Discrete Mathematics textbook by: Goodaire or Kenneth Ross easy to follow. Does it have lots of examples and exercises? What other discrete math books have you used?
    Frankly over a twenty-five period I have used more that ten different books.There is one feature of the text by Goodaire that students find very useful. Any exercise marked [BB] means that the answer is completely worked out in the back of the book.
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