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Math Help - Axioms

  1. #1
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    Axioms

    Any ideas on how to do this one?

    Let A be a set. Show that a complement of A does not exist. So I need to show that there isn't a set of all x not in A.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by spaceship42 View Post
    Any ideas on how to do this one?
    Let A be a set. Show that a complement of A does not exist.
    Are you quite sure that you have given the statement of that problem correctly?
    Is there more to the question that you have omitted?
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Plato View Post
    Are you quite sure that you have given the statement of that problem correctly?
    Is there more to the question that you have omitted?
    After that sentence it just says that the complement of A is the set of all x not in A.
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by spaceship42 View Post
    After that sentence it just says that the complement of A is the set of all x not in A.
    What axioms are you given?
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  5. #5
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    Oh, I'm sorry. I forgot that I'd called this thread "Axioms". This problem is about sets, not axioms. I mislabeled it accidentally.
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  6. #6
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    Hi,
    A is a set and B=\{x:\, x \not \in A\} ?
    Assuming axioms of ZF set theory, B can't be a set: If B were a set, then since A is a set, axiom of pairing gives that \{A,B\} is a set. Axiom of union then tells us that that there exist a set C whose elements are elements of A and elements of B. But from the definition of B we get that C is the universal class of all sets, which is a proper class, i.e. is not a set. This is a contradiction, thus B can't be a set.


    Can you see why the class of all sets is not a set?
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