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Math Help - Question in Functional Analysis

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    Question in Functional Analysis

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    Senior Member jakncoke's Avatar
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    Re: Question in Functional Analysis

    May i know what int E means ?
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    Re: Question in Functional Analysis

    I think it is interior of E.
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    Re: Question in Functional Analysis

    interior of E denoted ( int(E) or A^o
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    Re: Question in Functional Analysis

    Quote Originally Posted by soso123 View Post
    interior of E denoted ( int(E) or A^o
    There are many, many different notations for the interior of a set. That is why you should always define the terms you post.

    Now to question. The second is easier to prove that the first.

    If \left\{ {x,y} \right\} \subset \overline{E} \;\& \;\varepsilon  > 0 then suppose that \alpha~\&~\beta are positive numbers such that \alpha+\beta=1. Now (\exists x_1\&y_1)\in E such that \|x-x_1\|<\varepsilon~\&~\|y-y_1\|<\varepsilon
    Now you need to show that \|\alpha x+\beta y-(\alpha x_1+\beta y_1)\|<\varepsilon which shows that (\alpha x+\beta y)\in\overline{E} WHY?


    The first problem is a bit more involved. You must show that no point on the path from two points in \text{INT}(E) contains a point of the \beta(E), the boundary of E (see what I mean about defining terms?)
    There is a standard concept of an internal point of a convex set. At first, that is what I thought you meant. However, that does not appear to be the case here. So you most lookup that concept. Then prove the theorem that: each point of the interior of a convex subset of a topological vector space is an internal point.
    The proof depends upon the continuity of scalar multiplication.

    Be warned: I will not do this for you.
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