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Math Help - How do I prove that K is an upper bound for A with the following property?

  1. #1
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    How do I prove that K is an upper bound for A with the following property?

    Let A ⊆ R be an arbitrary set of real numbers, and let K ∈ R. Prove that K is an upper bound for A if and only if the following property holds: The limit of every convergent sequence made up of elements of A is at most K.

    I have no clue
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  2. #2
    Senior Member Tinyboss's Avatar
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    Here's a start in each direction:

    Suppose there's no sequence a_n in A with limit L>K. Since for any a in A, the sequence {a,a,a,...} has limit a, we know...?

    Now suppose there is a sequence a_n in A with limit L>K. Let epsilon=L-K. By the limit definition of a sequence, there must be an element of the sequence closer to L than epsilon, which means...?
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