Results 1 to 3 of 3

Math Help - proving the limit

  1. #1
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    88

    proving the limit

    Consider the sequence
    {√n(√(n + 1)-√n)} where n>=1 . If the limit exists, find it using ideas
    from first year, and then carefully prove that the limit is indeed your choice. If not, prove
    that the limit does not exist.
    Using first year ideas i found the limit to be 0. I am still working on the question but not really getting anywhere.. Any help would be nice
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor

    Joined
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    18,605
    Thanks
    1573
    Awards
    1
    The limit is \frac{1}{2} not 0.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    88
    Yea you are right it is 0.5.. How can I prove that it is upper bounded because that seems like the best way to prove it converges
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Proving limit
    Posted in the Differential Geometry Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: April 6th 2011, 12:38 AM
  2. Proving Limit
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: January 25th 2011, 09:50 PM
  3. Proving a limit.
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: September 22nd 2009, 08:55 PM
  4. Proving a limit
    Posted in the Differential Geometry Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: September 22nd 2009, 09:42 AM
  5. Proving the limit...
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: June 17th 2009, 06:18 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum