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Math Help - complex analysis help

  1. #1
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    complex analysis help

    If f(z),g(z) are entire functions such that f(g(z)) is a nonconstant polynomial. Show that both f(z), g(z) are polynomials. The hint says to use the Casorati-Weierstrass Theorem. But I still can't figure it out, can someone help please?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by dori1123 View Post
    If f(z),g(z) are entire functions such that f(g(z)) is a nonconstant polynomial. Show that both f(z), g(z) are polynomials. The hint says to use the Casorati-Weierstrass Theorem. But I still can't figure it out, can someone help please?
    I think it should go along these lines: assume g is not a polynomial. then it has an essential singularity at infinity (by which i mean that g(1/z^\bar)^\bar has essential singularity at zero -- you can make this precise). by casorati-weierstrass its image of some neighborhood of infinity is almost the whole complex plane. now image of almost-the-whole complex plane under any entire f is either the whole complex plane or a point. it cant be just a point since f(g(x)) is not constant. but f(g(x)) is a polynomial, so it has a pole at infinity, so image of a neighborhood of infinity must be a neighborhood of infinity.

    sorry for sloppiness and vagueness. if u want i can try making this precise.
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  3. #3
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    I got the idea. Thanks!
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