Results 1 to 2 of 2

Math Help - Mixtures type word problem

  1. #1
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2010
    Posts
    144

    Question Mixtures type word problem

    50 g of a certain chemical is added to 200mL of water; the chemical dissolves in water at a rate proportional to the product of the amount of undissolved chemical and the difference between concentrations in a saturated solution and the existing concentration in the solution. A saturated solution contains 25g of chemical in 100mL of solution.

    (a) Show that the differential equation that describes the situation is,

    \frac{dx}{dt} = \frac{k}{200}(50-x)^{2}, x(0) = 0

    where x(t) is the number of grams of dissolved chemical at time t.

    These word problems always cause me trouble. The question seems so complicated I don't even know what to start with.

    Can someone help me get started?
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
    skeeter's Avatar
    Joined
    Jun 2008
    From
    North Texas
    Posts
    11,885
    Thanks
    680
    breaking down and translating the problem statement (hope you're not color blind) ...

    the chemical dissolves in water at a rate proportional to the product of the amount of undissolved chemical and the difference between concentrations in a saturated solution and the existing concentration in the solution.
    dx/dt = k(50-x)(25/100 - x/200)

    if you put that together and you'll get the desired DE
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Mixtures
    Posted in the Differential Equations Forum
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: January 30th 2011, 05:01 PM
  2. Replies: 1
    Last Post: March 10th 2010, 11:05 PM
  3. Replies: 2
    Last Post: January 10th 2009, 05:49 AM
  4. Type TeX directly into Word
    Posted in the Math Software Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: December 3rd 2008, 08:04 AM
  5. Mixtures
    Posted in the Algebra Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: April 23rd 2008, 04:28 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum