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Math Help - Finding the Phase Shift of a Function.

  1. #1
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    Finding the Phase Shift of a Function.

    I have the function (1/37)cos3t+(6/37)sin3t. I am asked to find the amplitude, which I found quite easily, and the phase shift, which I am having trouble finding. Any help, even a little nudge in the general direction of the answer, would help. Thanks in advance.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by rgrimm01 View Post
    I have the function (1/37)cos3t+(6/37)sin3t. I am asked to find the amplitude, which I found quite easily, and the phase shift, which I am having trouble finding. Any help, even a little nudge in the general direction of the answer, would help. Thanks in advance.
    You rewrite this in the form:

     <br />
A \sin(\omega t+\phi)<br />

    using trig (the \sin may be a \cos if you are measuring phase shift wrt \cos rather than \sin)

    Then A is the amplitude and \phi is the phase.

    CB
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