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Math Help - Plane motion w/ parametric equations

  1. #1
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    Plane motion w/ parametric equations

    Can anyone help me specifically with isolating t and getting the cartesian form of equations? Such as in 1/2sint and 1/2cost.

    Also, can some explain the basics of plane motion?


    Any help would be greatly appreciated
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by aervid View Post
    Can anyone help me specifically with isolating t and getting the cartesian form of equations? Such as in 1/2sint and 1/2cost.

    Also, can some explain the basics of plane motion?


    Any help would be greatly appreciated
    The basic idea is to eliminate t from the equations x= f(t), y= g(t), however you can. Here, assuming you mean x= (1/2)sin t (as opposed to 1/(2sint)) and y= (1/2)cos t, then x^2+ y^2= (1/4)sin^2 t+ (1/4) cos^2(t) = (1/4)(sin^2 t+ cos^2 t)= 1/4 because sin^2(t)+ cos^2(t)= 1 for all t. You should be able to recognize x^2+ y^= 1/4 as a circle with center at (0,0) and radius 1/2.

    You question about the "basics of plane motion" is very general. If x= f(t) and y= g(t), then the "position vector" is \vec{r}(t)= f(t)\vec{i}+ g(t)\vec{j}. Assuming t is "time", then the "velocity vector" is \vec{v}(t)= \frac{d\vec{r}}{dt}= \frac{df}{dt}\vec{i}+ \frac{dg}{dt}\vec{j} and the acceleration vector is \vec{a}(t)= \frac{d\vec{v}}{dt}= \frac{d^2f}{dt^2}\vec{i}+ \frac{d^2g}{dt^2}\vec{j}.

    If you are given some force function, \vec{F} then you also need to use the equation \vec{F}= m\vec{a}.
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  3. #3
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    Oh ok so its basically the same as linear motion involving S(t), V(t), and A(t). And then to get the direction of the V(t) and A(t) we divide j by i right?
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