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Math Help - Series

  1. #1
    Member CalcGeek31's Avatar
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    Series

    In an experiment, a biologist introduces a toxin into a bacterial colony and then measures the effect on the population of the colony. Suppose that at time t(in minutes) the population is given by P(t) = 31 + (30t^2 +4t+1)/(1-5t^2) + 20e^(-.04t)(t+1) measured in thousands. What will the population be as t approaches infinity (measured in thousands)?


    I think this is a Series problem, help needed.

    Thanks in advance
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  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
    Jester's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by CalcGeek31 View Post
    In an experiment, a biologist introduces a toxin into a bacterial colony and then measures the effect on the population of the colony. Suppose that at time t(in minutes) the population is given by P(t) = 31 + (30t^2 +4t+1)/(1-5t^2) + 20e^(-.04t)(t+1) measured in thousands. What will the population be as t approaches infinity (measured in thousands)?


    I think this is a Series problem, help needed.

    Thanks in advance
    Well if your P(t) is

    P(t) = 31 + \frac{30t^2+4t+1}{1-5t^2} + 20 e^{-.04t}(t+1)

    then  \lim_{t \to \infty} P(t) = 31 - 6 = 25

    Not sure how you think this is a series though?
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  3. #3
    Member CalcGeek31's Avatar
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    i felt that it might be a series going from 0 to infinity of a power series
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