Results 1 to 4 of 4

Math Help - Stokes' Theorem

  1. #1
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    145

    Stokes' Theorem

    Use Stokes' Theorem to evaluate. C is oriented counterclockwise as viewed from above.

    F(x,y,z) = <e^-x, e^x, e^z>
    C is the boundary of the part of the plane 2x + y + 2z = 2 in the first octant.

    Just seeing one of these worked out would clear up a lot of my questions, if at all possible. Thank you in advance!
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor Calculus26's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2009
    From
    Florida
    Posts
    1,271
    See attachment
    Attached Files Attached Files
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  3. #3
    Member
    Joined
    Jan 2009
    Posts
    145
    Sorry, but I don't really follow what you did. Erm, could you possibly explain the steps? Sorry.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  4. #4
    MHF Contributor Calculus26's Avatar
    Joined
    Mar 2009
    From
    Florida
    Posts
    1,271
    Review Stokes Theorem from your text and I think the steps will be fairly

    obvious--If need be also review the basic idea of a surface integral.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 3
    Last Post: May 14th 2010, 11:04 PM
  2. Replies: 2
    Last Post: April 3rd 2010, 05:41 PM
  3. Stokes Theorem
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: June 24th 2009, 01:09 AM
  4. Stokes' Theorem
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: May 19th 2009, 04:02 AM
  5. Stokes Theorem help
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: November 26th 2007, 12:39 AM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum