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Math Help - How do I integrate this basic equation?

  1. #1
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    How do I integrate this basic equation?

    I was wondering how I integrate this basic equation:

    y' = 1 / (3 + 5x + x^2)


    Any help would be great, thanks.
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  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
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    Talking

    Complete the square in the denominator to convert to one of the inverse hyperbolic trig forms, which I believe works out as follows:

    . . . . . \left(x\, +\, \frac{5}{2}\right)^2\, -\, \left(\frac{\sqrt{13}}{2}\right)^2

    Then see if you can find a way to use the derivative formula you memorized for the inverse hyperbolic tangent....
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  3. #3
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    This was actually for an eingineering problem. The 3,5,1 weren't the actual values, I had values that were very large and irregular:

    e.g. 1/4.12x10^13 - (1.284x10^7)x + x^2

    Is there an easier way to integrate this? I'm not too sure about what you described above, stapel :P.
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