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Math Help - What does this symbol mean?

  1. #1
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    What does this symbol mean?

    HI

    Can anyone please tell me what is meant by that symbol between X and X ? I can do the questions myself but I dont know how to interprete that?

    http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/8/26200914210pmzs8.png

    Thanks
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by champrock View Post
    HI

    Can anyone please tell me what is meant by that symbol between X and X ? I can do the questions myself but I dont know how to interprete that?

    http://img23.imageshack.us/img23/8/26200914210pmzs8.png

    Thanks
    Read this: Elementary Calculus: Absolute Value Function
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  3. #3
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    oh ya i know absolute function. somehow i got confused and thought it was something else. just for confirmation , the answer is B right? it is a continous function everywhere and differentiable everywhere. But it is not differentiable at x=0?

    Thanks a lot
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  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by champrock View Post
    oh ya i know absolute function. somehow i got confused and thought it was something else. just for confirmation , the answer is B right? it is a continous function everywhere and differentiable everywhere. But it is not differentiable at x=0?

    Thanks a lot
    I suiggest you look more closely! f(x)= x|x|e^{-x} so f(x)= x^2e^{-x} for x\ge 0, f(x)= -x^2e^{-x} for x< 0. In particular, for h positive, what is
    \lim_{h\rightarrow 0^+}\frac{f(0+h)- f(0)}{h}= \lim_{h\rightarrow 0^+}\frac{h^2}{h}e^{-h}?

    For h negative, what is
    \lim_{h\rightarrow 0^-}\frac{f(0+h)- f(0)}{h}= \lim_{h\rightarrow 0^-}\frac{-h^2}{h}e^{-h}?
    Last edited by HallsofIvy; February 8th 2009 at 06:56 AM.
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  5. #5
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    hmm ur proof definately means that it is not continous. but i got this diagram drawn up from mathematica


    seems continous to me?
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  6. #6
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    i studied on continuity and thanks for pointing out that mistake of mine.

    But , I am again stuck. Going by the logic of the previous question, the following function should also be:
    1. Continous everywhere but Not continous at x=0
    2. Differentiable everywhere except x=0

    But this is not an option at all in the question. can you please guide me on this? (Again, I am not asking for an answer, but just help which can probably help me figure out the thing myself.)



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  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by champrock View Post
    hmm ur proof definately means that it is not continous. but i got this diagram drawn up from mathematica


    seems continous to me?
    If you are referring to f(x)= x|x|e^{-x}, absolutely NOT. That is both continuous AND differentiable everywhere since both of the limits I showed are 0!
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  8. #8
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    Hi HallsofIvy

    Actually they were both different questions. I am slightly confused.
    In the first question, the right hand limit was positive (+h) and the left hand side limit was negative (-h). That is why the function was not continous at x=0 because RHL will not be equal to LHL

    Following the same reasoning, in the second question, the right hand limit is positive (h*e^-h) and the left hand limit is negative (-h*e^-h). {since e^-h is positive always) So, the RHL is not equal to LHL in this case also. So, it is not continous?

    (I know something is wrong in the above reasoning, can you please clarify it?)

    Thanks
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  9. #9
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    any opinions?
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by champrock View Post
    Hi HallsofIvy

    Actually they were both different questions. I am slightly confused.
    In the first question, the right hand limit was positive (+h) and the left hand side limit was negative (-h). That is why the function was not continous at x=0 because RHL will not be equal to LHL
    No, no, no! the limit with h positive is \frac{h^2}h e^{-h}= he^{-h} and that goes to 0(1)= 0. The limit with h negative is [tex]\frac{h^2}{-h}e^{-h}= -he^{-h} and that goes to -(0)(1)= 0.

    Following the same reasoning, in the second question, the right hand limit is positive (h*e^-h) and the left hand limit is negative (-h*e^-h). {since e^-h is positive always) So, the RHL is not equal to LHL in this case also. So, it is not continous?
    The two limits are both 0.

    (I know something is wrong in the above reasoning, can you please clarify it?)

    Thanks
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  11. #11
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    well, if the two limits (RHL and LHL) are 0 for both the questions then both the functions are continous for all X? ? Is there anything wrong in this?
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