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Math Help - Solutions to differential equations

  1. #1
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    Solutions to differential equations

    I have (okay i cant get it to work.. it shows up in my latex but not here.. so here it is in non- latex format)

    d/dt [y_1 y_2 y_3]^T = [Math] \left[ \begin {array}{ccc} 1&0&0\\\noalign{\medskip}0&-1&1
    \\\noalign{\medskip}0&0&-1\end {array} \right] [/tex] [y_1 y_2 y_3]^T



    I need to solve explicitly for y .. but i dont know how to sovle for y_2(t) explicitly.

    -frig hold on im not sure wat my syntax error is.
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  2. #2
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    Smile

    Post the equation that you need resolved, so I can see it.
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    okay i got it up but its a lil ugly looking :P
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    I don't now ho to do
    Sorry
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Scopur View Post
    I have (okay i cant get it to work.. it shows up in my latex but not here.. so here it is in non- latex format)

    d/dt [y_1 y_2 y_3]^T = [Math] \left[ \begin {array}{ccc} 1&0&0\\\noalign{\medskip}0&-1&1
    \\\noalign{\medskip}0&0&-1\end {array} \right] [/tex] [y_1 y_2 y_3]^T



    I need to solve explicitly for y .. but i dont know how to sovle for y_2(t) explicitly.

    -frig hold on im not sure wat my syntax error is.
    This is about as close to trivial as you can get! That matrix equation reduces very quickly to three equations:
    \frac{dy_1}{dt}= y_1
    \frac{dy_2}{dt}= -y_2+ y_3
    \frac{dy_3}{dt}= -y_3

    You should be able to solve for y_1 and y_3 and apparently you have done that since you are only asking about y_2. Now put the function you got for y_3 into the equation for y_2 and you have a non-homogeneous equation for [itex]y_2[/sup]. Are you saying you cannot solve that?

    I presume you got y_1(t)= Ce^t/ and y_2(t)= De^{-t}. Putting that into the second equation, [tex]dy_2/dt= -y_2+ De^{-t}[/itex]. That's a linear equation with "integrating factor" [tex]e^{t}[/mathMultiplying the entire equation by e^t, we have e^t dy_2/dt+ e^ty_2= d(e^ty_2)/dt= D so e^ty= Dt+ E and y_2(t)= Dte^{-t}+ Ee^{-t}
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