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Math Help - Calculus

  1. #1
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    Calculus

    Im doing some calculus revision for my up coming end of year exam, and ive gotten myself a bit confused on this question:

    If x= f(t), y=g(t) and d(squared)y/dx(squared)= 0, prove that dx/dt times d(squared)y/dx(squared)=dy/dt times d(squared)x/dt(squared)

    sorry that looks a little confusing. I dont know how to type squared.

    I mostly understand how to go about doing the question, i just wonder what it means that d(squared)y/dx(squared)= 0. I know that if the second derrivative is less than zero, the turning point will be a maxium, and that if the second derrivative is more than zero, the turning point will be a minimum, so what will it be when the second derrivative = 0?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by Surreptitous_Smiles View Post
    Im doing some calculus revision for my up coming end of year exam, and ive gotten myself a bit confused on this question:

    If x= f(t), y=g(t) and d(squared)y/dx(squared)= 0, prove that dx/dt times d(squared)y/dx(squared)=dy/dt times d(squared)x/dt(squared)

    sorry that looks a little confusing. I dont know how to type squared.

    I mostly understand how to go about doing the question, i just wonder what it means that d(squared)y/dx(squared)= 0. I know that if the second derrivative is less than zero, the turning point will be a maxium, and that if the second derrivative is more than zero, the turning point will be a minimum, so what will it be when the second derrivative = 0?
    If the second derivative is 0 it means that you do not know whether it is a minimum of maximum point and you have to test it by other means .
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  3. #3
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    Oh okay. Thanks so much!
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