Results 1 to 2 of 2

Math Help - Difference between average and instantaneous velocity.

  1. #1
    Junior Member
    Joined
    Nov 2008
    Posts
    37

    Difference between average and instantaneous velocity.

    Someone please explain.
    An example would be lovely.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

  2. #2
    MHF Contributor
    Joined
    Oct 2005
    From
    Earth
    Posts
    1,599
    Velocity is defined as (change in position) / (change in time). At any particular moment, a moving object has move a direction and a speed, thus a velocity. That is the instantaneous velocity, the one at that instant. The change in time is part of a limit approaching zero.

    Now suppose you know a car drove 200 miles non-stop in 2 hours, didn't change directions or anything, but it wasn't driving at the same speed during the whole trip. If you take the change in position and divide by the total time, you will have an average velocity for the trip but that won't tell you anything about a particular time during the trip, just the trip as a whole.
    Follow Math Help Forum on Facebook and Google+

Similar Math Help Forum Discussions

  1. Replies: 12
    Last Post: September 29th 2010, 11:10 PM
  2. instantaneous velocity
    Posted in the Pre-Calculus Forum
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: August 4th 2010, 09:38 AM
  3. Replies: 3
    Last Post: February 20th 2010, 06:21 PM
  4. Instantaneous Velocity
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: May 19th 2009, 10:34 AM
  5. Instantaneous Velocity
    Posted in the Calculus Forum
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: February 5th 2007, 04:02 PM

Search Tags


/mathhelpforum @mathhelpforum