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Math Help - Derivative and Integral problems - PLEASE HELP! :)

  1. #1
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    Derivative and Integral problems - PLEASE HELP! :)

    Hello guys.

    I need quick help on these two problems from my math packet. One of them having to do with Derivatives and the other having to do with Integrals.

    Here are the problems I need the most help in:

    f(x)= \sqrt{ e^{7x} + e^{-7x}}

    and

    \int\frac{e^{\frac{4}{x^{2}}}}{6x^{3}}dx

    I really appreciate the help!

    Thank you all.
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSpades View Post
    Hello guys.

    I need quick help on these two problems from my math packet. One of them having to do with Derivatives and the other having to do with Integrals.

    Here are the problems I need the most help in:

    f(x)= \sqrt{ e^{7x} + e^{-7x}}

    Mr F says: Use the chain rule. Let {\color{red}u = e^{7x} + e^{-7x}}.

    and

    \int\frac{e^{\frac{4}{x^{2}}}}{6x^{3}}dx

    Mr F says: Make the sustitution {\color{red}u = \frac{4}{x^2}}.

    I really appreciate the help!

    Thank you all.
    ..
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  3. #3
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    I am trying to follow but i am still a little lost. This site is great tho this is what im learning in class. Well trying
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  4. #4
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    because u r finding f ' (x) not the integral
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  5. #5
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    f(x) = (e^{7x} + e^{-7x})^{\frac{1}{2}}

    straight-forward ... take the derivative using the chain rule.


    \int \frac{e^{\frac{4}{x^2}}}{6x^3} \, dx

    substitution ...

    let u = \frac{4}{x^2}

    du = -\frac{8}{x^3} \, dx

    -\frac{1}{6 \cdot 8} \int e^{\frac{4}{x^2}} \cdot \left(-\frac{8}{x^3}\right) \, dx
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  6. #6
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    wow my teacher does it differently
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  7. #7
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    but for the first question how do u slove the e's in side
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    Thanks for the help, guys.

    I'm going to try to figure out the one with the chain rule. We just started using that rule so I might be back for some help.
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  9. #9
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    Can you guys go a little further please
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  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSpades View Post
    Hello guys.
    f(x)= \sqrt{ e^{7x} + e^{-7x}}
    So guys, am I doing this right?

    <br />
f(x)= (e^{7x} + e^{-7x})^{\frac{1}{2}}

    f'(x)= \frac{1}{2}(e^{7x} + e^{-7x})^{-\frac{1}{2}}

    Now I was thinking that the e's in the parathesis can be differentiated but I always get confused with the e's and the fact that the exponents have the variable 'x'. How do I continue from here?
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  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by RedSpades View Post
    So guys, am I doing this right?

    <br />
f(x)= (e^{7x} + e^{-7x})^{\frac{1}{2}}

    f'(x)= \frac{1}{2}(e^{7x} + e^{-7x})^{-\frac{1}{2}} {\color{red}\left(7 e^{7x} - 7 e^{-7x}\right)} Mr F edits: You need the stuff in red.

    Now I was thinking that the e's in the parathesis can be differentiated but I always get confused with the e's and the fact that the exponents have the variable 'x'. How do I continue from here?
    Chain rule: \frac{dy}{dx} = \frac{dy}{du} \, \frac{du}{dx}.

    So the stuff in red is needed. It's the 'du/dx bit' of the chain rule. Your answer only has the 'dy/du' bit ....
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  12. #12
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    (e^(7x) * 7 + e^(-7x) * -7)^1/2

    7e^(7x )+ -7e^(-7x)

    is this right
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  13. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by mr fantastic View Post
    Chain rule: \frac{dy}{dx} = \frac{dy}{du} \, \frac{du}{dx}.

    So the stuff in red is needed. It's the 'du/dx bit' of the chain rule. Your answer only has the 'dy/du' bit ....
    Ohhhh! I forgot to do the rest of that. I knew I was missing a part of the rule.
    Thanks Mr. Fantastic.
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