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Math Help - parametric representation of a curve

  1. #1
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    parametric representation of a curve

    Find a parametric representation for the curve x^2 + y + z = 2 and xy + z = 1.
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    Quote Originally Posted by superfets View Post
    Find a parametric representation for the curve x^2 + y + z = 2 and xy + z = 1.
    This looks a bit tricky, because the curve splits into two separate pieces. If you subtract the sescond equation from the first then you get x^2+y-xy=1, which factorises as (x-1)(1+x-y)=0.

    So the curve consists of the two pieces x=1,\ y+z=1 and y=x+1,\ z=1-x-x^2. It's easy enough to parametrise the two pices separately, and that is presumably the best that can be done.
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    thanks for the effort

    Don't think that's what i'm looking for. The first eq'n is a surface (parabolic cylinder) and the second eq'n is a plane. The intersection of the surface and the plane in 3 dimensions will give you a curve. It can't be in 2 pieces. I need to describe this curve by the three parametric functions. i.e. C; x = x(t) , y = y(t) , z = z(t). But thanks for trying.
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    Quote Originally Posted by superfets View Post
    Find a parametric representation for the curve X^2 + y + z = 2 and xy + z = 1.
    There's an infinite number of possible answers. One possible answer:

    Let x = t.

    t is the parameter.

    Now solve for y and z simulataneously in terms of t:

    y + z = 2 - t^2 .... (1)

    ty + z = 1 .... (2)

    You can think about the possible values t can have ......
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by superfets View Post
    Don't think that's what i'm looking for. The first eq'n is a surface (parabolic cylinder) and the second eq'n is a plane. The intersection of the surface and the plane in 3 dimensions will give you a curve. It can't be in 2 pieces.
    The second equation is certainly not a plane. The equation xy + z = 1 is not linear. It represents a hyperbolic surface which contains lines, including the line parametrised by (x,y,z) = (1,t,1-t) that I indicated in my previous comment.

    You can also see this by following mr fantastic's method and paying particular attention to his final paragraph (look carefully at what happens at the particular value t=1 in his parametrisation).
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