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Math Help - Problem that I don't know how to setup

  1. #1
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    Problem that I don't know how to setup

    Use the sandwich theorem to explain why
    <br />
\lim_{x \rightarrow \ 0}x^2*cos(1/x)=0<br />

    Should I pick two other functions around this function and solve for their limits? What would be two good functions to pick?
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  2. #2
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    Quote Originally Posted by 66replica View Post
    Use the sandwich theorem to explain why
    <br />
\lim_{x \rightarrow \ 0}x^2*cos(1/x)=0<br />

    Should I pick two other functions around this function and solve for their limits? What would be two good functions to pick?
    Yes, pick two other functions. You want a function that is always greater than or equal to, and one that is always less than or equal to your function. Since cos(x) is always less than or equal to 1, the function x^2 is always greater than your function. I'll let you figure out the lower function.
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  3. #3
    Super Member Showcase_22's Avatar
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    I have yet to study this at university but I did this:



    And a graph of it shows:



    So it seems to work well.
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