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Math Help - substitution rule

  1. #1
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    substitution rule




    Why it is "
    3e^u + c" and not "3(e^u + c)" ?

    Thanks...
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  2. #2
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    Hi zorspas,

    C is an arbitrary constant. If you had 3(e^u+C)=3e^u+3C the 3C is still constant and so this could be be written 3e^u+A where A=3C is a constant which is the same as 3e^u+C as both A and C are constant. It's just quicker and easier to write.
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  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by zorspas View Post



    Why it is "3e^u + c" and not "3(e^u + c)" ?

    Thanks...
    3 e^u + C is equivalent to 3 (e^u + K).

    1. Note the different symbol used for each arbitrary constant.
    2. C = 3K.
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  4. #4
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    Thanks a lot...
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