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Math Help - epsilon delta

  1. #1
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    epsilon delta

    whats the deal with this wacky theorem? i learned it in class and had a mild understanding of it, but i don't see the use in defining a limit like that.
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  2. #2
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    It's not a wacky theorem. It's just a way of defining a limit. If you put some thought into it, the epsilon-delta definition of a limit makes a lot of sense.
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  3. #3
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    See here for a video on the subject.



    I agree in that something that is rather intuitive is turned into a complicated sounding mess that can put new calc students off the subject.
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  4. #4
    MHF Contributor kalagota's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Dubulus View Post
    whats the deal with this wacky theorem? i learned it in class and had a mild understanding of it, but i don't see the use in defining a limit like that.
    very big.. especially when you are really into mathematics..

    and.. you have been reading my service for yong on the other thread, right?
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  5. #5
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    i was just kiddin around with the wacky theorem remark...but once you've defined it in that respect, what do you do with it? i went through all my calculus courses and i never heard of it until my advanced mathematics class. so if im not using the definition to actually learn what it is, whats the point?
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  6. #6
    MHF Contributor kalagota's Avatar
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    pointless.. and in fact, mathematicians are trying to work on spaces that will never exist such as \mathbb{R}^n for n\geq4. and the question is, WHY?

    ...and, why do you stay as a math major knowing this situation?...


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    anyways, since we are trying to study spaces (some of which never would exist), how would you explain that a "point" approaches another "point" along a function? for me, the easiest way to explain this is thru that epsilon-delta definition. since we were taught that this definition looks very much like our intuitive definition in one, two or three dimensional real-valued functions, it should be easily understood. (make sense? maybe.. )

    and if you asked me back why i stay as a math major, i'll answer "i just want to see and to appreciate the beauty of mathematics, aside from getting a degree and wanting to pass what i have learned, nothing so special.".... and i remember what my professors told us, "Learning mathematics(and when they say mathematics, they meant the broadest mathematics) should be a passion. If you only want money, you better shift out to another course."(i just want to share this..)
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